Day 2 Schedule


Tuesday, July 23, 2019
7:00 - 8:00am POD and Committee Meetings
Groups Meeting:
Communications Pod, Union Court seating area
7:30 am Continental Breakfast Strafford Room
8:00 am Announcements Granite State Room
8:15 am Current Issues: Presentation and Panel
New England Fisheries: Learning form Yesterday, Adapting for Tomorrow
Panel discussion
Granite State Room
9:30 - 10:00 am Coffee Break in exhibit hall Strafford Room
10:00 - 10:45 am Session 1 Session Rooms in MUB
11:00 - 11:45 am Session 2 Session Rooms in MUB
12:00 - 1:00 pm Chapter Lunch Holloway Commons
Chapter Basket Ticket Sales Granite State Room
Exhibits Open Strafford Room
1:00 - 1:45 pm Speaker: Dr. Francesca Santoro
Ocean Liiteracy: Opportunities and challenges
Granite State Room
1:45 - 2:15 pm Chapter Basket Winners Drawn Granite State Room
2:30 - 3:15 pm Session 3 Session Rooms in MUB
3:15 - 3:30 pm Afternoon snack in exhibit hall Strafford Room
3:30 - 4:15 pm Session 4 Session Rooms in MUB
4:15 - 5:00 pm POD and Committee Meetings Session Rooms in MUB
Groups meeting:
International Committee, Room 334
Ocean Literacy, Theater II
Awards, Room 330
Conference, Room 332
5:30 pm Dinner and Auction Festivities (doors open at 5:00 pm) Hamel Recreation Center


Session Descriptions

Tuesday, July 23, Session 1, 10:00-10:45 am
  • Room 162
    Latrece Johnson, Y.E.S
    Y.E.S. (Young Environmental Stewards)--Beginning with environmental literature!
    CANCELED

  • Room 302
    Craig Strang with Geraldine Fauville and Mac Cannady
    The International Ocean Literacy Survey V4: Can we measure the impact of our work?
    Dozens of scientists and educators around the world have collaborated since 2015 to develop the IOLS as a free, open-source, grass roots instrument for measuring levels of Ocean Literacy. In winter 2019, over 6,000 students speaking 15 different languages from a wide range of countries responded to V4 of the survey. Join us to hear the results and brainstorm next steps for this community-based project.
    All Audiences

  • Room 330
    Jenny East, Oregon Sea Grant with Joanna Philippoff
    Who makes up NMEA? Results of a survey to learn about current membership
    Last year the NMEA Education Research and Evaluation Committee created a demographics survey and 385 members participated. This session will cover the results of that survey including: gender identity, racial/ethnic background, age, income, and profession. We will also lead a discussion on what role this information might play in crafting future opportunities, member recruitment, and fundraising. When possible we will make comparisons to a similar NMEA demographics survey conducted in 2002.
    All Audiences

  • Room 332
    Joan Muller, Waquoit Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve with Barbara Spiecker, Joan Muller, Suzanne Kahn and Caryn Beiter
    Increasing scientific literacy for deaf and hard of hearing students and their teachers
    Imagine if science terms were spelled out to you letter by letter - how would that impact your ability to learn? For native American Sign Language (ASL) students, fingerspelling also requires them to process content in another language, English. The language barrier is made worse by the need for experiential connections between classroom instruction and the vibrant realities of estuaries and watersheds. Come learn from a unique partnership formed to work on reducing these barriers.
    All Audiences

  • Room 334
    Laura Chaibongsai, Miami Waterkeeper with Dana Tricarico
    Creating a junior ambassador
    This discussion will serve as an overview for informal marine educators to create a curriculum-based environmental leadership program for High School students. This year-long program was originally created by Miami Waterkeeper, a non-profit organization, but has since been compiled together to create a more standardized approach for others looking to create youth leaders in this field. We will train others to implement this program in a way that best suits their marine threats and stakeholders.
    9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Informal Educators

  • Room 336
    Sarah Pedemonte, Lawrence Hall of Science with Emily Weiss
    Designing effective climate change activities for the public
    Well-designed learning experiences can help learners engage and grapple productively with complex topics. In this session, we will introduce two solution-oriented ocean and climate change-themed activities developed using a learning cycle framework that incorporates current research on how people learn. This framework can be applied to any learning experience. Participants will receive handouts on foundational ideas about learning, the learning cycle design framework, and digital access to the exemplar activities.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

  • Room 338
    Lynn Tran, Lawrence Hall of Science with David Bader
    Redefining professional learning to become inclusive and equity-focused informal educators
    This session will be an interactive dialogue for participants to build on experiences, consider ideas presented, and articulate what needs to be done to move our field forward. Conversation focus will include: (1) recognize the sociopolitical context that shaped our work, (2) confront what is meant by diversity, equity, and inclusion in this field and within our individual organizations, and (3) ways to challenge the norms and practices that only serve the dominant group.
    All Audiences, Informal Educators, Government Agencies

  • Room 340
    Talia Young, Princeton University
    Fishadelphia: High school students run a community-supported fishery
    CANCELED

  • Theater I
    Diana Payne, Connecticut Sea Grant with Sarah Schoedinger and Catherine Halversen
    Ocean literacy: What everyone should know about the ocean and how you can help share it with the world! (Part 1 of 2)
    Become a part of the Ocean Literacy Campaign! Learn about the Ocean Literacy Framework (Guide, Scope and Sequence, NGSS alignment) and local, regional, national, and international impacts. We will spend time exploring the tools developed to assist with integration of Ocean Literacy concepts inside and out of the classroom with a new comprehensive presentation on Ocean Literacy highlighting the entire suite of resources available to share the Ocean Literacy Framework with all audiences.
    All Audiences

  • Granite State Room: Briefing sessions (three 15 minute sessions)
    Valerie Cournoyer, Amity Regional High School
    Once is not enough: A quest to reduce "single use" plastics in the high school community
    How can you convince a high school community to skip the straw and give up vending machine water bottles? Combine art and science to bring awareness to the issue of plastics in the ocean! Marine biology students built a turtle sculpture and created educational materials to use at schoolwide awareness events. An artwork contest was held to create logos for reusable shopping bags. Funded by the Jamie A. Hulley Foundation. Come hear more!
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School)

    Shen-Yang Ni, National Taiwan Ocean University
    The research of using Alternate Reality Game (ARG) within marine museum experiential learning on students' flow experience and revisiting willingness
    The purpose of this study is using Alternate Reality Game (ARG) in marine museum experiential learning to explain the inquiry based learning theory on students’ flow experience and revisiting willingness. This research uses semi-experiment design on the fifth and sixth grade elementary school students who have field tripped in the National Museum of Marine Science and Technology.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Informal Educators, Researchers (scientific or educational)

    Kira Hughes, Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology
    A community effort: Using resilient corals to enhance coastal protection
    Learn about innovative coral research, discuss opportunities for community involvement in coral restoration, and engage in our inquiry-driven hands-on activities.
    All Audiences

Tuesday, July 23, Session 2, 11:00-11:45 am
  • Room 162
    Sean Den Bok, Seattle Aquarium
    Visual Thinking Strategies in Science (VTSS): One educational tool, two different worlds, three engaging questions
    Adapted from a well-researched method used in art museums, VTSS empowers the individual, creating accessible and learner driven experiences where educators can adapt programs to connect with their diverse audiences. VTSS supports NGSS, and creates an inclusive learning environment allowing participants to focus on skills such as critical thinking, creativity, effective communication, and adaptability.
    All Audiences

  • Room 330
    Leia Lowery, Kennebunkport Conservation Trust with Melissa Leutje, Dr Pam Morgan, and John Terry
    The changing Gulf of Maine: Start a conversation and empower action through community based education
    Learn how students studying the Gulf of Maine, are conducting research through low-cost instrumentation and starting a real conversation in the community about climate change. This collaboration between a land trust, a high school, a university and the Gulf of Maine Institute is using community based stewardship to empower a group of civic-minded students to create real change in their community.
    9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators

  • Room 332
    Mary Carla Curran, Savannah State University with Mindy L. Richlen
    Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) in New England: How do they impact your food?
    New England waters are routinely monitored to assess the intensity and prevalence of Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs), which can render valuable shellfish resources unsafe for human consumption. We will present an activity about a well-established HAB problem in the region. Students will learn how data on HAB cells and resting cysts are collected and used to ensure seafood safety and predict bloom magnitude. Door prizes will be awarded to participants and handouts distributed.
    All Audiences

  • Room 334
    Andrea Sassard, NOAA Office of Education with Christos Michalopoulos, Marissa Jones, and John Baek
    Updates to the NOAA Education Strategic Plan - Understanding and addressing the challenges facing NOAA Education
    NOAA Education is updating our Strategic Plan for 2020. We seek input from our constituents and partners in marine education. In this session, we’ll run though the plan quickly and hold the majority of the time (30 minutes) for a town hall-type listening session. It may help to familiarize yourself with our general plan structure before the session (https://www.noaa.gov/education/explainers/noaa-education-strategic-plan).
    All Audiences

  • Room 336
    Anthony Wasley, Hall High School
    Project-based learning with growing corals in the classroom
    Are you interested in growing corals in your classroom but are intimidated by the equipment, lighting, or costs associated with this type of project? In this session, we will explore ways to successfully design, build, and maintain a saltwater aquarium in which you can grow and breed corals with your students. In addition, we will discuss how growing corals can create opportunities for long-term research projects throughout the school year in your classroom.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators

  • Room 338
    Chia Dai (Ray) Yen, National Taiwan Ocean University
    Apply TPACK theory to construct the relationship between marine education professional Literacy and student marine science learning effectiveness
    The session will show the marine education policy and the information distribution system in Taiwan. And introduce the MTPACK (Marine Technology, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge) framework of teachers' marine education competency. And the research results of MTPACK to students' marine science learning efficiency.
    All Audiences

  • Room 340
    Janet Dykstra, Innovative Science Content Design, LLC
    The challenge of NGSS design
    The NGSS challenge both formal and informal educators to engage students in authentic three-dimensional learning as they make sense of a phenomenon or design a solution to a problem. Learn how to design activities and lessons to meet the rigor of these new standards. Discussion will include qualities of a good anchor phenomenon/design problem and using the 5E instructional model as a framework for NGSS lesson design. Marine science resources and examples will be shared.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Informal Educators, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

  • Theater I
    Diana Payne, Connecticut Sea Grant with Sarah Schoedinger and Catherine Halversen
    Ocean literacy: What everyone should know about the ocean and how you can help share it with the world! (Part 2 of 2)
    Become a part of the Ocean Literacy Campaign! Learn about the Ocean Literacy Framework (Guide, Scope and Sequence, NGSS alignment) and local, regional, national, and international impacts. We will spend time exploring the tools developed to assist with integration of Ocean Literacy concepts inside and out of the classroom with a new comprehensive presentation on Ocean Literacy highlighting the entire suite of resources available to share the Ocean Literacy Framework with all audiences.
    All Audiences

  • Theater II: Briefing sessions (three 15 minute sessions)
    Harry Nelson, Fluid Imaging Technologies; Markus Frederich, Stephan Zeeman, Nicole Poulton
    New lower-cost Imaging Particle Analyzer (FlowCam*) makes microbial ecology studies accessible to undergraduate curricula
    Marine science education is limited by what can be covered in class time, by budgets, and with available equipment. Microbial ecology studies, such as plankton population monitoring, can be difficult to execute for undergraduate laboratory classes due the time investment necessary to perform statistically-significant population counts using common optical microscopes. A new, lower-cost model of the FlowCam digital imaging particle analyzer is now available, making high-throughput, high-volume plankton studies accessible to lower budgets.
    9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

    Shannon Davis, UMASS-Boston
    Communicating ocean and coastal acidification
    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations leads to ocean acidification (OA) that affects the dissolution of rocks, the health of organisms, and the functioning of ecosystems. This session will explore the science and impacts of OA and novel ways to communicate and demonstrate several difficult, key concepts needed to understand OA at all levels.
    All Audiences

    Pamela Chapman, Harper Woods Triumph Middle School
    Empowering educators to conquer the marine science gap
    One of the biggest challenges is near absence of minorities in the ocean sciences. The under-representation of ethnic/racial groups in marine science disciplines is a priority issue to be addressed. This dynamic interactive workshop will focus on solutions for empowering educators confronting the Marine Science Gap. Participants will be given hands-on opportunities to examine the importance of students’ cultural capital: language, culture, and interests. The workshop will focus on equity pedagogies in a fluid meaningful way.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), Informal Educators

Tuesday, July 23, Session 3, 2:30-3:15 pm
  • Room 162
    Laura Avery
    Learning the ropes: Critical Skills for early-career marine researchers
    Moved to Granite State Room

  • Room 330
    Patrick Wells, Memorial University
    CaNOE ocean education lessons launched on World Oceans Day 2019
    The CaNOE Education and Outreach Group developed educational tool kits for Canada’s World Ocean Day, World Ocean Week, and the ocean themed Science Literacy Week. These kits use a variety of resources to engage educators and students while addressing Ocean Literacy principles and curriculum outcomes. This presentation will describe the process of resource development, present tool kits, and then devote the majority of the presentation time to reviewing tool kit lessons for K-6, 7-9, and 10-12 groupings.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Informal Educators

  • Room 332
    Demi Fox, NOAA Marine Debris Program/Freestone Environmental Services
    How to talk trash: Lessons from NOAA's Marine Debris Program
    Marine debris is a growing, global issue. Because most students do not have opportunities to interact with marine debris, the NOAA Marine Debris Program brings the ocean to the classroom using educational resources that engage the next generation in discussions around marine debris removal, research, and prevention. From desktop exercises to litter analyses, the workshop offers lessons for each type of learner and will provide participants with the tools necessary to inspire conservation.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators

  • Room 334
    Brian Slopey, VTVLC
    Hands on Marine Biology in an online/ hybrid environment
    Marine Biology is designed to inspire young adults to understand and care about the ocean, regardless of what occupation they pursue. The course is educationally innovative in that it is a hybrid course combining online learning and face to face learning. Also it is multi school and multi age with students in grades 9-12 in the same class. Students conduct research on Fish populations at BIOS using the REEF protocols.
    9 - 12 Teachers (High School)

  • Room 336
    Meredyth Sullivan, Gulf of Maine Research Institute with Leigh Peake
    Using local storylines and large climate data sets to teach trend
    Follow the process of taking complex NASA data sets and leading middle school students through an experiences to explore trends, and patterns in climate-related data.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), Informal Educators

  • Room 338
    Susan Farady, University of New England
    Reinventing an interdisciplinary marine affairs curriculum for the 21st century
    As coastal and marine issues become more and more complex, so do the needs of those engaged in them, whether it be as an educator, a manager or a conservationist. The skill set required for many positions goes beyond traditional science education. This session will explore the development of an interdisciplinary, undergraduate curriculum in marine affairs, and how marine educators may want to include similar aspects in their curriculum.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators

  • Room 340
    Richard Baldwin, Miniboat Research Collaborative
    Building a successful miniboat collaborative with: Universities, professors, schools, naval architects, research centers & more
    Learn how we developed this voluntary collaborative of Universities, professors, schools, naval architects, and research centers to build this collaborative. Together we designed a specialty boat which can be equipped with computer steering, autopilot, and scientific sensors. We work with schools, universities, and research centers around the world. Hear about the adventures and learning opportunities these miniature sailboats offer as they cross oceans and how we were able to develop this collaboration.
    All Audiences, PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Researchers (scientific or educational)

  • Theater I
    Amy Cabaniss, University of Rhode Island with Karin Jakubowski and Thomas Webler
    Getting to ACTION!
    Motivating environmentally-responsible behavior can be challenging. Thankfully, research literature has shed light on ways to enhance environmental education and communication efficacy. This 45-minute conference session is two-fold, to: provide session participants with information and tools for moving individuals toward responsible actions that benefit coastal and marine environments; and introduce the NOAA Marine Debris Grant applied research project, “The butt of a joke: Using humor in social media messages to motivate proper cigarette butt disposal.”
    College Instructors, Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

  • Theater II
    Kanesa Duncan Seraphin, University of Hawaii Sea Grant with David Christopher and Diana Payne
    Are you ready for the next storm, flood, or hurricane? Explore regional hazards and uses of the Sea Grant Homeowners Handbook to help prepare communities for natural hazards!
    Explore the types of hazards most common in your region and learn how to help prepare your community! Representatives from Connecticut, Delaware and Hawaii Sea Grant will share techniques and strategies for educating children and adults about natural hazards including NGSS- aligned activities, multi-media, and region-specific “Homeowner’s Handbooks to Prepare for Natural Hazards.” Participants will explore similarities and differences across regions, provide feedback to improve activities, outreach, and evaluation, and gain access to shared resources.
    All Audiences

  • Granite State Room: Briefing sessions (three 15 minute sessions)*
    Richard Zack, Blue Planet Strategies
    Educating marine audiences about the benefits of rope-less fishing technologies: Is there more than saving whales?
    Rope-less fishing technologies could be a revolutionary solution to the annual entanglement and death of dozens of large whales and to the recovery of the endangered North Atlantic Right Whale. A variety of advanced and sophisticated rope-less systems have been developed. How can marine educators craft a message that reach audiences that are critical to motivate if these systems are to be adopted.
    College Instructors, Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

    Samantha Whitcraft, M/V Oceans for Youth
    Science, Conservation & learning in the gardens of the Queen National Park, Cuba
    In 2018, the embargo on U.S publishing of Cuban marine science was lifted. Published studies included how urban pollution impacted coral reefs off Havana versus the conservation successes of more remote MPAs; and how Cuban resource management and land-use practices have helped protect some threatened species that are now rare outside of Cuba. Today, many of Cuba’s reefs represent a nearly pristine, historical baseline for a healthy Caribbean coral reef ecosystem.
    All Audiences, 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

    Laura Avery, MEOPAR (Marine Environmental Observation, Prediction and Response Network)
    Learning the ropes: Critical skills for early-career marine researchers
    The Marine Environmental Observation, Prediction and Response Network (MEOPAR) is a Canadian Network of Centres of Excellence, connecting top marine researchers across the country with trainees, partners and communities. In 2018, MEOPAR launched our first needs assessment, gathering feedback from students, faculty, and professionals working in marine research in the public, private and not-for-profit sectors. This session will report on the results and make recommendations for future studies on critical skills for early-career marine researchers.
    College Instructors, Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

Tuesday, July 23, Session 4, 3:30-4:15 pm
  • Room 162 (Moved from Theater I)
    Adam Frederick, Maryland Sea Grant
    Biofilms, biodiversity and digital microscopy
    In 1997 the Biofilms and Biodiversity project was constructed by bringing together some classic elements of field biology, current research at the Center of Marine Biotechnology (now the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology), and methods for delivering interactive instruction on the Internet through Maryland Sea Grant. The research connection links the influence of biofilm communities on the settling of other organisms. These communities are a fantastic window into microscopy, aquatic ecology, and biodiversity.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

  • Room 330
    Raelene Child, Aquarium of the Pacific
    Jumping on the DIY trend to help take action against climate change
    Student volunteers have created a Do It Yourself sustainability workshop that focuses on the renter population of our community.
    9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Informal Educators

  • Room 332
    Kirsten Berezay, Loveland Living Planet Aquarium
    On the hook: Skeptical audiences and evolving identities
    How can we foster green identities in skeptical audiences? How can geographically or perceptually disconnected citizens become allies of the ocean? This session explores how identity can be used to overcome barriers, disconnection, and division in the greater effort to achieve our missions and goals. Now is the time to realize we are all “on the hook” for the future of the planet.
    All Audiences, Informal Educators

  • Room 334
    Jane Deng, NYC Parks with Leeann Dabydeen
    Marine education in NYC with the Urban Park Rangers
    New York City Parks Urban Park Rangers offer a wide variety of educational programming that connect New Yorkers to the marine word and strive to foster stewardship of oceans and beaches. The Rangers will share their strategies, successes and challenges of marine education with workshop attendees to encourage further discussion. Participants will get an insightful look into urban marine education.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Informal Educators, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

  • Room 336
    Tom Mullin, Unity College
    Creating sustainable internship programs with academic institutions
    Marine Education centers across the country often say, "let’s get a college intern to help us out," but finding the right match and understanding the complexities that go along with cooperating with a college or university can be daunting. Come learn the best practices and share your stories of success.
    Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

  • Room 338
    Leslie Sautter, College of Charleston
    Exploring deep sea coral habitats of the Southeast U.S. Continental Margin
    Abundant communities of deep sea coral were recently explored by the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer in water depths ranging 800 to 1800m. Many corals and other organisms were found on rocky terraces, and others were discovered living at the crests of enormous mounds that occur beneath the Gulf Stream. These mounds are constructed of dead coral rubble accumulated for thousands of years. This video-rich presentation showcases these diverse benthic habitats and their substrates.
    All Audiences

  • Room 340
    Danielle Bailey, The University of Southern Mississippi with J. Kastler and A. Lamey
    Watershed education: Connection, restoration, and sturgeon surveys
    Human delineated boundaries limit the understanding of watershed connectivity. To educate the local community about restoration, use of watersheds, and stewardship, a three day curriculum was designed. These lessons are taught using Gulf Sturgeon as an example of a local fish species that uses a habitat often restored and part of the local watershed. Participants will take part in one of the lessons. This connection through sturgeon and watershed activities will strengthen our communities’ perception of limited connectivity.
    All Audiences

  • Theater I (Moved to Rm 162)
    Adam Frederick, Maryland Sea Grant
    Biofilms, biodiversity and digital microscopy

  • Theater II
    Catherine Halversen, UC Berkeley with Kurt Holland, Diana Payne, Sarah Schoedinger, and Craig Strang
    Alignment of ocean literacy to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)
    The Alignment of Ocean Literacy to NGSS is an innovative and rigorous document that shows why teaching ocean concepts is integral and essential to achieving the vision of NGSS. This session will provide school leaders, teachers, informal educators, and curriculum developers with evidence and tools to prove that statement. In addition, this tool offers guidance to informal science educators as they design and implement STEM experiences aligned with NGSS in their work with formal classroom teachers.
    All Audiences

  • Granite State Room: Briefing sessions (three 15 minute sessions)
    Celia Cackowski, Virginia Institute of Marine Science
    Building the BRIDGE: 20 years of supporting ocean literacy
    The BRIDGE website, a popular ocean education portal, has been serving marine educators since 1998. In honor of its 20th Anniversary, the BRIDGE recently received a full redesign that incorporated new features and a more intuitive search function. Come learn about the BRIDGE, its resources, and how it has evolved!
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

    Cynde McInnis, The Whalemobile
    Inflatable humpback whale inspires change!
    Enrichment programs in schools are a great way for students to have an experiential experience (especially in this time where field trips are often cost or time prohibitive). The Whalemobile is a life-sized inflatable humpback whale (modeled after a real humpback whale that is often seen off the coast of Massachusetts in the summer). Programs are presented at schools, libraries and summer camps with the mission of inspiring the next generation of ocean advocates.
    All Audiences

    Anne Smrcina, Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary
    STEM to STEAM: The beauty of biodiversity
    The ocean is filled with a diverse array of amazing creatures, and students have been demonstrating that in the annual marine art contest sponsored by MA Marine Educators and Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary. We will look at how both art and science learning objectives can be approached by studying and drawing local marine species.
    All Audiences