Concurrent Session Presentations


If you are interested in presenting a poster for the Student Conference, please visit the Student Conference webpage for more information and to submit an application.


Day 1

Monday July 22, Session 1, 10:00-10:45 am
  • Room 302
    Susan Haynes and Geraldine Fauville, NMEA International Committee Co-Chairs
    Welcoming International Colleagues to NMEA
    This session will welcome our ocean science and education colleagues from afar to the NMEA family, introduce you to the organization, and give us all an opportunity to get to know one another as we embark on a great week of learning.
    All Audiences

  • Room 330
    Sara Smith, The Marine Mammal Center with Jennifer Walker
    A living curriculum
    Explore how informal education organizations like The Marine Mammal Center are uniquely positioned to support classroom learning through a “living curriculum.” As the world’s largest marine mammal hospital and a partner in science education, we have a wealth of resources to demonstrate the ever-evolving nature of science, support student engagement and collaborate with teachers as thought partners to regularly updated content that meets the needs of learners in the many unique communities we serve.
    All Audiences, 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School) ,Informal Educators, Researchers (scientific or educational)

  • Room 332
    Celia Cackowski, Virginia Institute of Marine Science
    Bridge DATA series: The heat is on
    Using the longest continuous record of atmospheric carbon dioxide measurements (Mauna Loa) and greenhouse gas data, participants will evaluate trends over the past 60 years as well as seasonal variations in sea level.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators

  • Room 334
    Kartik Jha, SmartStart Evaluation and Research with Joshua Penman
    How to think like an evaluator
    This presentation will provide a clear, basic framework for you to conduct your own evaluation or engage with external evaluators. We will present a crash course on how to develop SMART goals and a theory of change, collect and interpret evaluation data, and use findings to improve student learning outcomes and measure program success. This presentation is for educators and coordinators who are interested in evaluating their educational program but don’t know where to start.
    All Audiences

  • Room 336
    Grace Simpkins, Woods Hole Sea Grant
    Salmon, shellfish, and cetaceans, oh my!
    The Coasts, Oceans, and Stewardship (COAST) Program is a collaboration between Woods Hole Sea Grant and the NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center with lessons designed for K-8 students. See how to integrate data into your classroom lessons to meet the NGSS and Ocean Literacy principles. Get an overview of lessons ranging from analyzing aerial survey data for North Atlantic right whale identification to working with Atlantic salmon telemetry data from Maine.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), Informal Educators

  • Room 338
    Bill Andrake, Swampscott Middle School
    Trout in the classroom
    For twenty years, the aquaculture of Atlantic Salmon and Eastern Brook Trout has been an integral part of my middle school science program. Raising fish from eggs in December to their release as fry in Spring has provided a “real world” application of many science principles while promoting teamwork, responsibility, and problem solving. This project has fostered a sense of stewardship for our “world of water” while offering a unique experience with delayed gratification.
    All Audiences

  • Room 340
    Thomas Greene, Kingsborough Community College with Blanca Ching
    Is it safe? Monitoring sewage pollution in coastal waters
    In this workshop, participants will learn how to test their local waters for sewage contamination by using an EPA approved technique that can reveal the extent to which shellfishing, swimming, boating and drinking waters meet public health standards.
    9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

  • Theater I
    Sylvia Spalding, Western Pacific Fishery Management Council
    Sticking a finger in the pie: Creating ways to teach students about fisheries and traditional knowledge
    Millennia before Western contact, human populations on small, remote Pacific islands used place-based, intergenerational observation to develop traditional knowledge that allows them to balance use and conservation of resources, such as fisheries. Today, the Western path has led to coastal habitat loss, ecosystem disruptions and climate change. Traditional knowledge is increasingly sought by native and non-native populations to address these resource and climate change issues. Learn how educators are overcoming challenges to teach these subjects.
    All Audiences

  • Theater II
    Bob Chen, University of Massachusetts Boston
    Eight key concepts of ocean and environmental science
    Similar to the Ocean Literacy Principles, we have developed a set of eight (8) Key Concepts of Ocean and Environmental Science. In teaching environmental and/or ocean science to Grade 1-16 students, focusing on the big ideas is more flexible, more effective, and more powerful than using traditional textbooks with 20-25 topics/chapters. This session will explore the 8 Key Concepts of Ocean and Environmental Science and their use in a variety of educational settings.
    All Audiences, PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Researchers (scientific or educational)

  • Granite State Room: Briefing sessions (three 15 minute sessions)
    Kate Achilles, NOAA; Meghan Marrero, David Bader
    NMEA 101
    Are you new to NMEA? Are you looking to become more active in the organization? Do you wonder what NMEA is doing to advance our mission around the world? Please join us to learn about NMEA's history, current projects, and future goals, and how you can become more involved. Meet our leadership team and make connections, old and new.
    All Audiences

    Angelica Baylon, MAAP
    Climate change mitigation by private company stakeholders in the Philippines
    The presentation will provide an overview of how an NGO composed of private companies join together for environmental protection and management in support of the government. A model named Integrated Bataan Coastal care management will be shared.
    Informal Educators, Government Agencies

    Patrick Wells, Holy Spirit High School with Jan Negrijn
    Place based education: Monitoring ocean water temperatures
    In a place-based learning project, high school students under the supervision of local mariners developed, built, and deployed arrays to monitor ocean water temperatures in Conception Bay (NL). The arrays documented temporal variations related to depth, seasonality, and weather conditions. Temperature data was correlated with the seasonality of migratory species. The project brought forth aspects of learning that were unexpected and these challenges and solutions are revealed in this presentation.
    9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors,Informal Educators, Researchers (scientific or educational)

Monday July 22, Session 2, 11:00-11:45 am
  • Room 162
    Julia Peterson, NH Sea Grant and UNH Cooperative Extension
    Integrating social science with outreach projects
    This presentation will provide participants with information about the benefits and challenges of integrating a social science component with their outreach projects. It will include things to think about when considering a social science component and tips for working with social scientists to get helpful information that can strengthen a program's needs assessment, design, delivery or evaluation.
    All Audiences

  • Room 302
    Tami Lunsford, Newark Charter School
    Marine science in a 3-dimensional Biology lesson
    Come experience a three-dimensional lesson using primary production in the ocean as a phenomenon! See how a NOAA OER resources were modified to hit biology content standards and NGSS!
    9 - 12 Teachers (High School),College Instructors

  • Room 330
    Nancy FitzGerald, Academy for Environmental Science
    Piece, love, and data
    An important piece of the Next Generation Science Standards is getting students to work with data, often this translates to students creating graphs. Learn how to turn students on to data that goes well beyond graphing. This session will use two lessons supported by the Monterey Bay Research Institute's EARTH initiative to show teachers how they can combine art and science to get their students to love working with data.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary),6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School),9 - 12 Teachers (High School)

  • Room 332
    Aldyn Markle, Hampshire College
    Approaching the iceberg: Navigating effective communication and accessibility in informal ocean and climate change education
    This session examines what creates an effective informal ocean and climate change education from multiple perspectives. I will be drawing from cognitive science, behavior change and educational research, as well as feminist science studies and research on cultural accessibility and incorporating diverse perspectives in informal science education.
    Informal Educators

  • Room 334
    Taylor Planz, Harlem High School
    Learn & teach: The mystery of the disappearing destination
    In February 2017, the famed crab fishing vessel Destination suddenly vanished in the Bering Sea. After search and rescue missions halted, the sunken vessel remained missing. After 5 months, NOAA Ship Fairweather's sonar technology put the mystery to rest. In this session, you'll learn how to amplify your physical science waves unit by engaging students in problem-based learning to discover the fate of F/V Destination and the 5 dedicated fishermen whose lives were lost that day.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School)

  • Room 336
    Amanda Rinehart, Artist Boat
    Student design and install of WaterSmart Landscapes to reduce surface water runoff from school campuses
    We, Back the Bay, created awareness of stormwater runoff, developed critical thinking skills, and created action to increase water conservation and reduce storm runoff from school campuses. Using experiential and project-based learning in the classroom and outdoors we increased knowledge and improved attitudes of 6-12th grade students, and stewarded Galveston Bay via the student-led design and installation of WaterSmart Landscapes on five campuses. Landscapes will ultimately result in long-term water quality improvement of Galveston Bay.
    All Audiences

  • Room 338
    Jens Bjelvenmark, Gullmarsgymnasiet High School, Sweden with Perilla Wegén
    Lab tools and Dynamene: Understanding our world and inspiring young students in the field of science
    The making of scientific equipment can be a fantastic driving force to inspire young people in the field of science. The maker movement has enabled schools, teachers and students to create scientific instruments that can be very powerful and much cheaper than if bought from commercial vendors. Moreover, by building these instruments students come to understand that they often are based on scientific principles they understand and know.
    9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors

  • Room 340
    Chris Flight, Dauphin Island Sea Lab Discovery Hall Programs
    Are there sharks in these waters? Using data to find out
    Ask a student to think about a shark and they immediately think about things like teeth, large size, and Sharkweek. But sharks are so much more than a week of teeth on TV. They’re an ideal way to help students see how scientists analyze data and draw conclusions from it. Join Dauphin Island Sea Lab educators as they demonstrate how you can incorporate real data from Gulf of Mexico shark research into your classroom.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School) ,Informal Educators

  • Theater I
    Avery Sward, Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) with Sandra Huynh
    Using approaches from the past, creating art in the present, & preserving the environment for the future
    In the early-mid 1900s, artist and naturalist Walter Anderson would commune with nature for inspiration. His art style is encompassed in South Mississippi culture. At the Grand Bay NERR, we partner with artists to bring ecology to culturally-influenced art. Combining Walter Anderson’s approaches to art with science creates opportunities to educate our community. We hope by sharing our lessons learned from our art workshop process, that our audience is inspired to create culturally infused workshops.
    Informal Educators,Government Agencies

  • Theater II
    Craig Strang, Lawrence Hall of Science
    Bridging the gap: Different perspectives on equity and inclusion
    Equity and inclusion are much-discussed in marine/environmental education, yet professionals in these fields continue to be among the least diverse in all of education. Lawrence Hall of Science conducted an evaluation study that revealed there is little common understanding of what equity and inclusion look like in practice. This presentation showcases the perspectives of mostly white organizational leaders and educators of color, identify patterns, and share insights on how to bridge the gap.
    All Audiences

  • Granite State Room: Briefing sessions (three 15 minute sessions)
    Dorothea Sanders, UGA Marine Extension GA Sea Grant with Dr. Jay Brandes
    Building capacity for microplastics research and education using the tried and true citizen science model
    Citizen science programs offer benefits to research groups, monitoring agencies and policymakers and have shown that they can positively impact communities as participants become more informed and empowered. We will highlight how we are using lessons from the past - citizens scientists - to create marine research and education opportunities associated with microplastics research underway along the coast of Georgia.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors,Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

Monday July 22, Session 3, 1:15-2:00 pm
  • Room 162
    Kathy Zagzebski, National Marine Life Center with Sandra Ryack-Bell
    Using marine animals to engage non-traditional audiences in STEM and ocean literacy
    Women are often underrepresented in STEM fields. One way to engage women, girls, and other underrepresented audiences in STEM is by incorporating marine animals and marine science subject matter in the classroom. Appreciation of animals cuts across gender and socioeconomic boundaries, and topics involving animals can attract and involve many students that might not otherwise be interested in STEM or Ocean Literacy.
    All Audiences

  • Room 330
    Jennifer Magnusson, National Marine Educators Association
    Navigating social media for ocean education
    Dive into social media and explore how you can enhance your online presence. Join this interactive session to learn how to measure success and maximize your time and resources. Connect with NMEA's Social Media Community Manager to build relationships between regional chapters, member institutions, and individuals so we can amplify the message of ocean and climate literacy.
    Informal Educators, Resource Managers

  • Room 332
    Jenn Page, Hurricane Island Center for Science and Leadership
    Using the UN Sustainable Development goals to meaningfully connect students to marine education
    This session will help participants connect the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to their own curriculum using marine systems as an entry point. Educators will leave with actionable plans to implement relevant aspects of the SDGs through interdisciplinary, place-based approaches.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators

  • Room 334
    Lyndsey Manzo, Ohio Sea Grant with Angela Greene
    Sink or swim! Making marine education for teachers more engaging, efficient and effective
    Are you staying current with best practices in professional development for teachers? Over the last five years, Ohio Sea Grant Education Specialists piloted a variety of unique, contemporary strategies to improve marine education for K-12 teachers. Learn about three extremely successful tools and practice how to implement them in programming. Attendees will receive resources and templates to aid in raising participant engagement, enhancing program efficiency, and improving the effectiveness of marine education for teachers.
    College Instructors, Informal Educators

  • Room 336
    Sean Russell, EarthEcho International
    Activating young ocean educators and conservationists with EarthEcho International
    The future of marine education and conservation depends on inspiring young people to take action now to address critical sustainability issues in their communities. Through this engaging session, you’ll learn about EarthEcho International’s suite of educational programs, digital resources, and hands on learning opportunities that inspire young people to pursue STEM careers, cultivate their leadership skills, and activate the next generation of conservationists and educators.
    All Audiences

  • Room 338
    Jaclyn Robidoux, Maine Sea Grant with Morgan Cuthbert, Jenn Page, and Liz Johndrow
    Connecting to your community: Marine education and aquaculture in the classroom
    New England is rich in its communities and traditional history linked to the marine environment. This session seeks provide tested tools and applied resources to make connections between classrooms, communities and marine ecosystems. We hope to share our experience in authentic and place-based science explorations.
    All Audiences

  • Room 340
    Anne Smrcina, Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary
    Follow that seabird
    Like canaries in coal mines, shearwaters may prove to be harbingers of Gulf of Maine health as well as indicators of the availability of sand lance and other prey. Satellite tags allow us to follow their movements here in their feeding grounds and later along their long-distance migration. In this workshop, we will cover recent research on seabird health, plot tracks of bird movements and see how ocean observing data can be used.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Informal Educators

  • Theater I
    Steve Morton, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS; Jennifer Maucher-Fuquay, Kevin Hollerbach, Antonio Bravo, Harry Nelson
    Citizen science and the future of Harmful Algal Bloom monitoring
    Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) have become more prominent in the public eye, and the increasing frequency and duration of these HAB events continues to make the national news. NOAA’s Phytoplankton Monitoring Network is a citizen science volunteer-based program in which participants are trained by NOAA scientists to identify the presence of potentially harmful algal species associated with HABs. This presentation will touch on methods and how data are used to develop and refine new models for predicting HABs.
    All Audiences

  • Theater II
    Ariel Zych, The Science Friday Initiative
    Cephalopod Week: Best practices and lessons learned from six years of a successful social media campaign
    In 2014 Science Friday launched a weeklong hashtag-driven social and multimedia campaign to promote cephalopods. Six years later, we explore the widespread success of #CephalopodWeek, which now reaches over 20 million social media users every June. We’ll walk through best practices for building a large social media campaign, things that didn’t work, and take a peek into the dim waters of measuring the learning, interest, and information-sharing that occurs in a multi-platform campaign.
    College Instructors, Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

  • Granite State Room: Briefing sessions (three 15 minute sessions)
    Leigh Peake, Gulf of Maine Research Institute with Meredyth Sullivan
    Citizens, cities, schools, and science: An integrated approach to building coastal resilience
    The Gulf of Maine Research Institute collaborates with coastal municipalities, community groups, and high schools to make the complex impacts of sea level rise concrete. Through multi-generational and multi-stakeholder engagement, we’re collaboratively building community resilience against climate change.
    9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

    Robert Rocha, New Bedford Whaling Museum
    Using marine animal models to teach classification
    Our 'Sorting it All Out' program was created as a means to teach life science standards that relate to shared characteristics and adaptations. Through a combination of examining our whale skeletons, handling of actual animal parts, powerpoint slides, and plastic or rubber animal models, students are active participants in learning the basics of classification.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), Informal Educators

Monday July 22, Session 4, 2:15-3:00 pm
  • Room 162
    Dax Ovid, Call of the Sea with Nancy Richardson and Linda Chilton
    Ocean literacy under sail: Experience the connections between NMEA and Tall Ships
    This session will overview the unique opportunities marine educators have to advance Ocean Literacy Principles under sail with student-centered, experiential learning at the core.
    All Audiences

  • Room 330
    Mary Colvard, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
    Novel icefish genes, adaptation, and human health
    Antarctic icefish species possess unique adaptations that enable them to thrive in an icy, food-rich environment. Learn how new genes formed and old genes acquired new roles resulting in these adaptations. Workshop participants will engage in hands-on activities that model icefish blood, view sections of a thirteen-minute film, and learn how an understanding of icefish adaptations may help in treating two common human diseases. Participants will leave with a DVD, handouts, and new ideas.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators

  • Room 332
    Cynde McInnis, The Whalemobile; Jen Kennedy
    Make the right choice for Right Whales, right NOW
    Right whales are charismatic megafauna--they are huge and awe-inspiring. Right now, they are fighting for their survival. The Year of the Right Whale 2020 Campaign seeks to raise awareness of the plight of the right whale and encourage action to help protect this species. The workshop will be a training session for the curriculum that can be used in both informal and formal educational settings. Come see how you can help save right whales by teaching your students about them!
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), Informal Educators

  • Room 336
    Maggie Pletta, DNREC, Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve
    Shrinkage, not just in cold water anymore: An educational activity on how climate change is affecting bill size in birds
    Participate in and provide feedback on a new interactive activity for middle and high school students to learn about climate change and the impacts it is having on a species’, the Red Knot, ability to forage for food and reproduce.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Informal Educators

  • Room 338
    Geraldine Fauville, Stanford University
    Virtual reality in marine education
    Join me to discuss a new comer in marine education: Virtual Reality (VR). I will present the current research in VR for marine education and tell you about the undergoing research at the Stanford Virtual Human Interaction Lab where I conduct research on VR for environment and marine education.
    All Audiences

  • Room 340
    Tina Miller-Way, Dauphin Island Sea Lab with Rachel McDonald
    Tracking trash with drifters
    Drifters have long been used to track ocean currents. Today, however, some of those currents are carrying trash. Drifters can be used to track this trash, but perhaps more importantly, they can be used to help find solutions. Come join us to build mini-drifters, investigate the problems of marine debris and microplastics and explore a series of STEM lesson plans that can be used with students to address trash problems in their local waterways.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Researchers (scientific or educational)

  • Theater I
    Hannah MacDonald and Anne Smrcina, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
    Inspire the next generation by connecting with National Marine Sanctuaries through telepresence technology
    Large exploration and research vessels will be exploring the deep-water regions of America’s underwater parks and you can join along through Telepresence technology. These live ship-to-shore interactions from the vessel into your classroom or facility will help inspire the next generation of innovators. Learn more and pick up free materials.
    All Audiences

  • Theater II
    Chuck Getter, Career Tech High School with Tracy Crews
    How to set up a drone-based marine mammal monitoring curriculum for high school students
    Tools and Techniques for Tomorrow: This required developing innovation to find ways to merge two technologies, namely aviation science and marine mammalogy. The Tool used was a Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA). The Technique was teaming up with a government licensed whale expert aboard a research vessel. Oregon Sea Grant acted as an extension agent to find the appropriate university scientist to collaborate with our drone class.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

  • Granite State Room: Briefing sessions (three 15 minute sessions)
    Kate Leavitt, Seacoast Science Center with Danielle Bastian
    Mind the gap
    Learn how an informal marine science institution used Arc GIS mapping tools to strategically assess and bolster its regional school programming reach.
    Informal Educators, Resource Managers

    Michelle L. "Mick" Walsh, Florida Keys Community College
    Tropical Ornamental Mariculture Technician Certificate at Florida Keys Community College
    Tropical marine aquaculture is increasingly used for conservation efforts focused on coral reef species and restoration projects. Environmental concerns over global degradation of many reef ecosystems necessitates the need for training qualified technicians. The Tropical Ornamental Mariculture Technician certificate is designed to develop technician-level skills that will help fill the marine aquaculture-based jobs of the future while helping supply the demand for oceanic resources from a cultured environment and not the ocean.
    9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Resource Managers,Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

Monday July 22, Session 5, 3:15-4:00 pm
  • Room 162
    Yolanda Sanchez
    It is working? Science education tools to promote sustainable attitudes in marine conservation
    The disconnection between scientific knowledge and the society affects the capacity of making responsible decisions negatively. There are efforts to transfer scientific knowledge, for example, through informal science education programs created to increase ocean literacy in the community. Increase awareness is expected by increase knowledge, driving attitudes towards sustainability, but it is really happening? Are the educational tools that we use in our educational programs effective?
    All Audiences

  • Room 330
    Jill Bartolotta, Ohio Sea Grant
    The quick and dirty of trash in the water
    Marine debris is found everywhere on this planet and it affects everything and everyone. This hands-on session will demonstrate easy to make and deliver activities that can be used to educate people on the issue of marine debris in the classroom or on the go at an outreach event. Come get your hands dirty as we discover the issue of marine debris in our waters and what we can do about it.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators

  • Room 332
    Symone Johnson, National Aquarium
    Informal learning institutions partnering with higher learning institutions for large environmental education programs
    National Aquarium works with local colleges and universities in various types of partnerships to provide a meaningful watershed education experience to sixth graders by conducting hands-on scientific investigations of Baltimore’s Harbor. The partnerships established through this program have proven to be effective in connecting youth, college students, informal learning intuitions, and higher education institutions. National Aquarium would like to show others how this model could be carried out in other cities to create new partnerships.
    College Instructors, Informal Educators, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

  • Formerly Room 334 - Moved to Quad Way
    Patrick Flanagan, Ocean Learning Lab and Immersive Experiences
    Explore the ocean in a digital submarine
    In this session, we'll travel to a coral reef in Bermuda aboard OLLIE's traveling immersive virtual submarine, investigate the changing local and global ocean and climate, and learn about local research and conservation efforts.
    All Audiences, 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

  • Room 336
    Katie Pelon, Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation
    Engaging students in microplastics research in the classroom
    In a new educational program, we aim to bring the experience of researching microplastics into the classroom for elementary, middle, and high school students, which we will demonstrate for participants in this hands-on session. Curricula and worksheets for conducting this program in the classroom will be provided to educators.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Informal Educators

  • Room 338
    Jane Ji, Springbay Studio Ltd.
    Engaging kids in environmental stewardship through game-based learning
    CANCELED

  • Room 340
    Julianne Mueller-Northcott, Souhegan High School
    Updating the Intertidal Transect Field Study
    The Intertidal Transect Field Study is a classic exercise in marine biology. It gets students out into dynamic intertidal ecosystem, introduces them to interesting marine creatures, and teaches them many scientific practices. But could your intertidal transect field study use some updating? This collaborative session will be focused on improving this fundamental activity. Come prepared to share and brainstorm ideas for helping students get the most out of the intertidal transect.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Researchers (scientific or educational)

  • Theater I
    Hannah MacDonald, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
    Exploring your National Marine Sanctuaries in 360: Education using virtual reality
    Learn how to bring national marine sanctuaries to your organization through the use of 360 media. Through this virtual resource, viewers dive into national marine sanctuaries through virtual reality using smartphones, tablets, computers and virtual reality headsets. This immersive experience will connect the audience with an understanding of national marine sanctuaries, key species and marine ecosystems.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

  • Theater II
    Edward Cormier, Portsmouth Naval Shipyard with Tara Hicks-Johnson
    Seaperch: Bringing ROVs into the classroom
    SeaPerch is an innovative program which leads students through the building and testing of a small, underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV). The SeaPerch program provides students with a hands-on learning experience which incorporates robotics, engineering, science, and mathematics. Students will improve teamwork and problem solving skills while learning engineering concepts and technical applications. The SeaPerch program is designed for students in 7th grade through high school (with some flexibility).
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Government Agencies

  • Granite State Room: Briefing sessions (three 15 minute sessions)
    Drew Bush, McGill University
    Place-based and technology enabled marine climate change education at the Shoals Marine Laboratory on Appledore Island, ME
    No longer speaking

    Kristen Crawford, School District of the Chathams with Dr. Meghan Marrero
    What factors lead kids to engage in positive ocean behaviors?
    The ocean is our planet’s most significant feature, and yet is being plagued by numerous environmental concerns. Many stress that today’s youth will effect change to save our ocean. But, what factors lead to students taking action for change while they are young? This study of students in the United States used qualitative methodologies to uncover the factors that lead to students feeling compelled to engage in positive ocean behaviors and empowered to do so.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Researchers (scientific or educational)

    Holly Morin, University of Rhode Island (URI), Inner Space Center (ISC), and the Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO)
    Connect to the Arctic, LIVE, with the Northwest Passage Project!
    From July 17- August 5, 2019, scientists, students, education, and film professionals will set sail on the Swedish Polar Secretariat’s Icebreaker Oden to explore and investigate the changing Arctic as part of the innovative Northwest Passage Project (NPP; www.northwestpassageproject.org). Connect LIVE with NPP participants and learn more about this 18-day journey of exploration! Hear about research activities, community events in Pond Inlet, Nunavut, and life onboard the 354 ft Oden.
    All Audiences

Day 2

Tuesday, July 23, Session 1, 10:00-10:45 am
  • Room 162
    Latrece Johnson, Y.E.S
    Y.E.S. (Young Environmental Stewards)--Beginning with environmental literature!
    CANCELED

  • Room 302
    Craig Strang with Geraldine Fauville and Mac Cannady
    The International Ocean Literacy Survey V4: Can we measure the impact of our work?
    Dozens of scientists and educators around the world have collaborated since 2015 to develop the IOLS as a free, open-source, grass roots instrument for measuring levels of Ocean Literacy. In winter 2019, over 6,000 students speaking 15 different languages from a wide range of countries responded to V4 of the survey. Join us to hear the results and brainstorm next steps for this community-based project.
    All Audiences

  • Room 330
    Jenny East, Oregon Sea Grant with Joanna Philippoff
    Who makes up NMEA? Results of a survey to learn about current membership
    Last year the NMEA Education Research and Evaluation Committee created a demographics survey and 385 members participated. This session will cover the results of that survey including: gender identity, racial/ethnic background, age, income, and profession. We will also lead a discussion on what role this information might play in crafting future opportunities, member recruitment, and fundraising. When possible we will make comparisons to a similar NMEA demographics survey conducted in 2002.
    All Audiences

  • Room 332
    Joan Muller, Waquoit Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve with Barbara Spiecker, Joan Muller, Suzanne Kahn and Caryn Beiter
    Increasing scientific literacy for deaf and hard of hearing students and their teachers
    Imagine if science terms were spelled out to you letter by letter - how would that impact your ability to learn? For native American Sign Language (ASL) students, fingerspelling also requires them to process content in another language, English. The language barrier is made worse by the need for experiential connections between classroom instruction and the vibrant realities of estuaries and watersheds. Come learn from a unique partnership formed to work on reducing these barriers.
    All Audiences

  • Room 334
    Laura Chaibongsai, Miami Waterkeeper with Dana Tricarico
    Creating a junior ambassador
    This discussion will serve as an overview for informal marine educators to create a curriculum-based environmental leadership program for High School students. This year-long program was originally created by Miami Waterkeeper, a non-profit organization, but has since been compiled together to create a more standardized approach for others looking to create youth leaders in this field. We will train others to implement this program in a way that best suits their marine threats and stakeholders.
    9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Informal Educators

  • Room 336
    Sarah Pedemonte, Lawrence Hall of Science with Emily Weiss
    Designing effective climate change activities for the public
    Well-designed learning experiences can help learners engage and grapple productively with complex topics. In this session, we will introduce two solution-oriented ocean and climate change-themed activities developed using a learning cycle framework that incorporates current research on how people learn. This framework can be applied to any learning experience. Participants will receive handouts on foundational ideas about learning, the learning cycle design framework, and digital access to the exemplar activities.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

  • Room 338
    Lynn Tran, Lawrence Hall of Science with David Bader
    Redefining professional learning to become inclusive and equity-focused informal educators
    This session will be an interactive dialogue for participants to build on experiences, consider ideas presented, and articulate what needs to be done to move our field forward. Conversation focus will include: (1) recognize the sociopolitical context that shaped our work, (2) confront what is meant by diversity, equity, and inclusion in this field and within our individual organizations, and (3) ways to challenge the norms and practices that only serve the dominant group.
    All Audiences, Informal Educators, Government Agencies

  • Room 340
    Talia Young, Princeton University
    Fishadelphia: High school students run a community-supported fishery
    CANCELED

  • Theater I
    Diana Payne, Connecticut Sea Grant with Sarah Schoedinger and Catherine Halversen
    Ocean literacy: What everyone should know about the ocean and how you can help share it with the world! (Part 1 of 2)
    Become a part of the Ocean Literacy Campaign! Learn about the Ocean Literacy Framework (Guide, Scope and Sequence, NGSS alignment) and local, regional, national, and international impacts. We will spend time exploring the tools developed to assist with integration of Ocean Literacy concepts inside and out of the classroom with a new comprehensive presentation on Ocean Literacy highlighting the entire suite of resources available to share the Ocean Literacy Framework with all audiences.
    All Audiences

  • Granite State Room: Briefing sessions (three 15 minute sessions)
    Valerie Cournoyer, Amity Regional High School
    Once is not enough: A quest to reduce "single use" plastics in the high school community
    How can you convince a high school community to skip the straw and give up vending machine water bottles? Combine art and science to bring awareness to the issue of plastics in the ocean! Marine biology students built a turtle sculpture and created educational materials to use at schoolwide awareness events. An artwork contest was held to create logos for reusable shopping bags. Funded by the Jamie A. Hulley Foundation. Come hear more!
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School)

    Shen-Yang Ni, National Taiwan Ocean University
    The research of using Alternate Reality Game (ARG) within marine museum experiential learning on students' flow experience and revisiting willingness
    The purpose of this study is using Alternate Reality Game (ARG) in marine museum experiential learning to explain the inquiry based learning theory on students’ flow experience and revisiting willingness. This research uses semi-experiment design on the fifth and sixth grade elementary school students who have field tripped in the National Museum of Marine Science and Technology.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Informal Educators, Researchers (scientific or educational)

    Kira Hughes, Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology
    A community effort: Using resilient corals to enhance coastal protection
    Learn about innovative coral research, discuss opportunities for community involvement in coral restoration, and engage in our inquiry-driven hands-on activities.
    All Audiences

Tuesday, July 23, Session 2, 11:00-11:45 am
  • Room 162
    Sean Den Bok, Seattle Aquarium
    Visual Thinking Strategies in Science (VTSS): One educational tool, two different worlds, three engaging questions
    Adapted from a well-researched method used in art museums, VTSS empowers the individual, creating accessible and learner driven experiences where educators can adapt programs to connect with their diverse audiences. VTSS supports NGSS, and creates an inclusive learning environment allowing participants to focus on skills such as critical thinking, creativity, effective communication, and adaptability.
    All Audiences

  • Room 330
    Leia Lowery, Kennebunkport Conservation Trust with Melissa Leutje, Dr Pam Morgan, and John Terry
    The changing Gulf of Maine: Start a conversation and empower action through community based education
    Learn how students studying the Gulf of Maine, are conducting research through low-cost instrumentation and starting a real conversation in the community about climate change. This collaboration between a land trust, a high school, a university and the Gulf of Maine Institute is using community based stewardship to empower a group of civic-minded students to create real change in their community.
    9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators

  • Room 332
    Mary Carla Curran, Savannah State University with Mindy L. Richlen
    Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) in New England: How do they impact your food?
    New England waters are routinely monitored to assess the intensity and prevalence of Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs), which can render valuable shellfish resources unsafe for human consumption. We will present an activity about a well-established HAB problem in the region. Students will learn how data on HAB cells and resting cysts are collected and used to ensure seafood safety and predict bloom magnitude. Door prizes will be awarded to participants and handouts distributed.
    All Audiences

  • Room 334
    Andrea Sassard, NOAA Office of Education with Christos Michalopoulos, Marissa Jones, and John Baek
    Updates to the NOAA Education Strategic Plan - Understanding and addressing the challenges facing NOAA Education
    NOAA Education is updating our Strategic Plan for 2020. We seek input from our constituents and partners in marine education. In this session, we’ll run though the plan quickly and hold the majority of the time (30 minutes) for a town hall-type listening session. It may help to familiarize yourself with our general plan structure before the session (https://www.noaa.gov/education/explainers/noaa-education-strategic-plan).
    All Audiences

  • Room 336
    Anthony Wasley, Hall High School
    Project-based learning with growing corals in the classroom
    Are you interested in growing corals in your classroom but are intimidated by the equipment, lighting, or costs associated with this type of project? In this session, we will explore ways to successfully design, build, and maintain a saltwater aquarium in which you can grow and breed corals with your students. In addition, we will discuss how growing corals can create opportunities for long-term research projects throughout the school year in your classroom.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators

  • Room 338
    Chia Dai (Ray) Yen, National Taiwan Ocean University
    Apply TPACK theory to construct the relationship between marine education professional Literacy and student marine science learning effectiveness
    The session will show the marine education policy and the information distribution system in Taiwan. And introduce the MTPACK (Marine Technology, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge) framework of teachers' marine education competency. And the research results of MTPACK to students' marine science learning efficiency.
    All Audiences

  • Room 340
    Janet Dykstra, Innovative Science Content Design, LLC
    The challenge of NGSS design
    The NGSS challenge both formal and informal educators to engage students in authentic three-dimensional learning as they make sense of a phenomenon or design a solution to a problem. Learn how to design activities and lessons to meet the rigor of these new standards. Discussion will include qualities of a good anchor phenomenon/design problem and using the 5E instructional model as a framework for NGSS lesson design. Marine science resources and examples will be shared.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Informal Educators, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

  • Theater I
    Diana Payne, Connecticut Sea Grant with Sarah Schoedinger and Catherine Halversen
    Ocean literacy: What everyone should know about the ocean and how you can help share it with the world! (Part 2 of 2)
    Become a part of the Ocean Literacy Campaign! Learn about the Ocean Literacy Framework (Guide, Scope and Sequence, NGSS alignment) and local, regional, national, and international impacts. We will spend time exploring the tools developed to assist with integration of Ocean Literacy concepts inside and out of the classroom with a new comprehensive presentation on Ocean Literacy highlighting the entire suite of resources available to share the Ocean Literacy Framework with all audiences.
    All Audiences

  • Theater II: Briefing sessions (three 15 minute sessions)
    Harry Nelson, Fluid Imaging Technologies; Markus Frederich, Stephan Zeeman, Nicole Poulton
    New lower-cost Imaging Particle Analyzer (FlowCam*) makes microbial ecology studies accessible to undergraduate curricula
    Marine science education is limited by what can be covered in class time, by budgets, and with available equipment. Microbial ecology studies, such as plankton population monitoring, can be difficult to execute for undergraduate laboratory classes due the time investment necessary to perform statistically-significant population counts using common optical microscopes. A new, lower-cost model of the FlowCam digital imaging particle analyzer is now available, making high-throughput, high-volume plankton studies accessible to lower budgets.
    9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

    Shannon Davis, UMASS-Boston
    Communicating ocean and coastal acidification
    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations leads to ocean acidification (OA) that affects the dissolution of rocks, the health of organisms, and the functioning of ecosystems. This session will explore the science and impacts of OA and novel ways to communicate and demonstrate several difficult, key concepts needed to understand OA at all levels.
    All Audiences

    Pamela Chapman, Harper Woods Triumph Middle School
    Empowering educators to conquer the marine science gap
    One of the biggest challenges is near absence of minorities in the ocean sciences. The under-representation of ethnic/racial groups in marine science disciplines is a priority issue to be addressed. This dynamic interactive workshop will focus on solutions for empowering educators confronting the Marine Science Gap. Participants will be given hands-on opportunities to examine the importance of students’ cultural capital: language, culture, and interests. The workshop will focus on equity pedagogies in a fluid meaningful way.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), Informal Educators

Tuesday, July 23, Session 3, 2:30-3:15 pm
  • Room 162
    Laura Avery
    Learning the ropes: Critical Skills for early-career marine researchers
    Moved to Granite State Room

  • Room 330
    Patrick Wells, Memorial University
    CaNOE ocean education lessons launched on World Oceans Day 2019
    The CaNOE Education and Outreach Group developed educational tool kits for Canada’s World Ocean Day, World Ocean Week, and the ocean themed Science Literacy Week. These kits use a variety of resources to engage educators and students while addressing Ocean Literacy principles and curriculum outcomes. This presentation will describe the process of resource development, present tool kits, and then devote the majority of the presentation time to reviewing tool kit lessons for K-6, 7-9, and 10-12 groupings.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Informal Educators

  • Room 332
    Demi Fox, NOAA Marine Debris Program/Freestone Environmental Services
    How to talk trash: Lessons from NOAA's Marine Debris Program
    Marine debris is a growing, global issue. Because most students do not have opportunities to interact with marine debris, the NOAA Marine Debris Program brings the ocean to the classroom using educational resources that engage the next generation in discussions around marine debris removal, research, and prevention. From desktop exercises to litter analyses, the workshop offers lessons for each type of learner and will provide participants with the tools necessary to inspire conservation.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators

  • Room 334
    Brian Slopey, VTVLC
    Hands on Marine Biology in an online/ hybrid environment
    Marine Biology is designed to inspire young adults to understand and care about the ocean, regardless of what occupation they pursue. The course is educationally innovative in that it is a hybrid course combining online learning and face to face learning. Also it is multi school and multi age with students in grades 9-12 in the same class. Students conduct research on Fish populations at BIOS using the REEF protocols.
    9 - 12 Teachers (High School)

  • Room 336
    Meredyth Sullivan, Gulf of Maine Research Institute with Leigh Peake
    Using local storylines and large climate data sets to teach trend
    Follow the process of taking complex NASA data sets and leading middle school students through an experiences to explore trends, and patterns in climate-related data.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), Informal Educators

  • Room 338
    Susan Farady, University of New England
    Reinventing an interdisciplinary marine affairs curriculum for the 21st century
    As coastal and marine issues become more and more complex, so do the needs of those engaged in them, whether it be as an educator, a manager or a conservationist. The skill set required for many positions goes beyond traditional science education. This session will explore the development of an interdisciplinary, undergraduate curriculum in marine affairs, and how marine educators may want to include similar aspects in their curriculum.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators

  • Room 340
    Richard Baldwin, Miniboat Research Collaborative
    Building a successful miniboat collaborative with: Universities, professors, schools, naval architects, research centers & more
    Learn how we developed this voluntary collaborative of Universities, professors, schools, naval architects, and research centers to build this collaborative. Together we designed a specialty boat which can be equipped with computer steering, autopilot, and scientific sensors. We work with schools, universities, and research centers around the world. Hear about the adventures and learning opportunities these miniature sailboats offer as they cross oceans and how we were able to develop this collaboration.
    All Audiences, PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Researchers (scientific or educational)

  • Theater I
    Amy Cabaniss, University of Rhode Island with Karin Jakubowski and Thomas Webler
    Getting to ACTION!
    Motivating environmentally-responsible behavior can be challenging. Thankfully, research literature has shed light on ways to enhance environmental education and communication efficacy. This 45-minute conference session is two-fold, to: provide session participants with information and tools for moving individuals toward responsible actions that benefit coastal and marine environments; and introduce the NOAA Marine Debris Grant applied research project, “The butt of a joke: Using humor in social media messages to motivate proper cigarette butt disposal.”
    College Instructors, Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

  • Theater II
    Kanesa Duncan Seraphin, University of Hawaii Sea Grant with David Christopher and Diana Payne
    Are you ready for the next storm, flood, or hurricane? Explore regional hazards and uses of the Sea Grant Homeowners Handbook to help prepare communities for natural hazards!
    Explore the types of hazards most common in your region and learn how to help prepare your community! Representatives from Connecticut, Delaware and Hawaii Sea Grant will share techniques and strategies for educating children and adults about natural hazards including NGSS- aligned activities, multi-media, and region-specific “Homeowner’s Handbooks to Prepare for Natural Hazards.” Participants will explore similarities and differences across regions, provide feedback to improve activities, outreach, and evaluation, and gain access to shared resources.
    All Audiences

  • Granite State Room: Briefing sessions (three 15 minute sessions)*
    Richard Zack, Blue Planet Strategies
    Educating marine audiences about the benefits of rope-less fishing technologies: Is there more than saving whales?
    Rope-less fishing technologies could be a revolutionary solution to the annual entanglement and death of dozens of large whales and to the recovery of the endangered North Atlantic Right Whale. A variety of advanced and sophisticated rope-less systems have been developed. How can marine educators craft a message that reach audiences that are critical to motivate if these systems are to be adopted.
    College Instructors, Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

    Samantha Whitcraft, M/V Oceans for Youth
    Science, Conservation & learning in the gardens of the Queen National Park, Cuba
    In 2018, the embargo on U.S publishing of Cuban marine science was lifted. Published studies included how urban pollution impacted coral reefs off Havana versus the conservation successes of more remote MPAs; and how Cuban resource management and land-use practices have helped protect some threatened species that are now rare outside of Cuba. Today, many of Cuba’s reefs represent a nearly pristine, historical baseline for a healthy Caribbean coral reef ecosystem.
    All Audiences, 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

    Laura Avery, MEOPAR (Marine Environmental Observation, Prediction and Response Network)
    Learning the ropes: Critical skills for early-career marine researchers
    The Marine Environmental Observation, Prediction and Response Network (MEOPAR) is a Canadian Network of Centres of Excellence, connecting top marine researchers across the country with trainees, partners and communities. In 2018, MEOPAR launched our first needs assessment, gathering feedback from students, faculty, and professionals working in marine research in the public, private and not-for-profit sectors. This session will report on the results and make recommendations for future studies on critical skills for early-career marine researchers.
    College Instructors, Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

Tuesday, July 23, Session 4, 3:30-4:15 pm
  • Room 162 (Moved from Theater I)
    Adam Frederick, Maryland Sea Grant
    Biofilms, biodiversity and digital microscopy
    In 1997 the Biofilms and Biodiversity project was constructed by bringing together some classic elements of field biology, current research at the Center of Marine Biotechnology (now the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology), and methods for delivering interactive instruction on the Internet through Maryland Sea Grant. The research connection links the influence of biofilm communities on the settling of other organisms. These communities are a fantastic window into microscopy, aquatic ecology, and biodiversity.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

  • Room 330
    Raelene Child, Aquarium of the Pacific
    Jumping on the DIY trend to help take action against climate change
    Student volunteers have created a Do It Yourself sustainability workshop that focuses on the renter population of our community.
    9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Informal Educators

  • Room 332
    Kirsten Berezay, Loveland Living Planet Aquarium
    On the hook: Skeptical audiences and evolving identities
    How can we foster green identities in skeptical audiences? How can geographically or perceptually disconnected citizens become allies of the ocean? This session explores how identity can be used to overcome barriers, disconnection, and division in the greater effort to achieve our missions and goals. Now is the time to realize we are all “on the hook” for the future of the planet.
    All Audiences, Informal Educators

  • Room 334
    Jane Deng, NYC Parks with Leeann Dabydeen
    Marine education in NYC with the Urban Park Rangers
    New York City Parks Urban Park Rangers offer a wide variety of educational programming that connect New Yorkers to the marine word and strive to foster stewardship of oceans and beaches. The Rangers will share their strategies, successes and challenges of marine education with workshop attendees to encourage further discussion. Participants will get an insightful look into urban marine education.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Informal Educators, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

  • Room 336
    Tom Mullin, Unity College
    Creating sustainable internship programs with academic institutions
    Marine Education centers across the country often say, "let’s get a college intern to help us out," but finding the right match and understanding the complexities that go along with cooperating with a college or university can be daunting. Come learn the best practices and share your stories of success.
    Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

  • Room 338
    Leslie Sautter, College of Charleston
    Exploring deep sea coral habitats of the Southeast U.S. Continental Margin
    Abundant communities of deep sea coral were recently explored by the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer in water depths ranging 800 to 1800m. Many corals and other organisms were found on rocky terraces, and others were discovered living at the crests of enormous mounds that occur beneath the Gulf Stream. These mounds are constructed of dead coral rubble accumulated for thousands of years. This video-rich presentation showcases these diverse benthic habitats and their substrates.
    All Audiences

  • Room 340
    Danielle Bailey, The University of Southern Mississippi with J. Kastler and A. Lamey
    Watershed education: Connection, restoration, and sturgeon surveys
    Human delineated boundaries limit the understanding of watershed connectivity. To educate the local community about restoration, use of watersheds, and stewardship, a three day curriculum was designed. These lessons are taught using Gulf Sturgeon as an example of a local fish species that uses a habitat often restored and part of the local watershed. Participants will take part in one of the lessons. This connection through sturgeon and watershed activities will strengthen our communities’ perception of limited connectivity.
    All Audiences

  • Theater I (Moved to Rm 162)
    Adam Frederick, Maryland Sea Grant
    Biofilms, biodiversity and digital microscopy

  • Theater II
    Catherine Halversen, UC Berkeley with Kurt Holland, Diana Payne, Sarah Schoedinger, and Craig Strang
    Alignment of ocean literacy to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)
    The Alignment of Ocean Literacy to NGSS is an innovative and rigorous document that shows why teaching ocean concepts is integral and essential to achieving the vision of NGSS. This session will provide school leaders, teachers, informal educators, and curriculum developers with evidence and tools to prove that statement. In addition, this tool offers guidance to informal science educators as they design and implement STEM experiences aligned with NGSS in their work with formal classroom teachers.
    All Audiences

  • Granite State Room: Briefing sessions (three 15 minute sessions)
    Celia Cackowski, Virginia Institute of Marine Science
    Building the BRIDGE: 20 years of supporting ocean literacy
    The BRIDGE website, a popular ocean education portal, has been serving marine educators since 1998. In honor of its 20th Anniversary, the BRIDGE recently received a full redesign that incorporated new features and a more intuitive search function. Come learn about the BRIDGE, its resources, and how it has evolved!
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

    Cynde McInnis, The Whalemobile
    Inflatable humpback whale inspires change!
    Enrichment programs in schools are a great way for students to have an experiential experience (especially in this time where field trips are often cost or time prohibitive). The Whalemobile is a life-sized inflatable humpback whale (modeled after a real humpback whale that is often seen off the coast of Massachusetts in the summer). Programs are presented at schools, libraries and summer camps with the mission of inspiring the next generation of ocean advocates.
    All Audiences

    Anne Smrcina, Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary
    STEM to STEAM: The beauty of biodiversity
    The ocean is filled with a diverse array of amazing creatures, and students have been demonstrating that in the annual marine art contest sponsored by MA Marine Educators and Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary. We will look at how both art and science learning objectives can be approached by studying and drawing local marine species.
    All Audiences

Day 3/Student Conference

Wednesday, July 24, Session 1, 10:00-10:45 am
  • Room 162
    Dennis Chasteen, University of New Hampshire Marine Docents and Department of Chemistry with Brandy Hardiman
    Teaching the fundamentals of ocean acidification
    This session will cover the relationship between rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide and increasing acidification of ocean waters and its impacts on marine species, particularly shell-forming organisms. In addition to slides and short video clips, the presentation will include demonstrations and hands-on activities illustrating the properties of CO2 relevant to ocean acidification. Visual observations of the chemistry through active participation of the student will be emphasized.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School)

  • Room 164
    Geraldine Fauville
    VR Workshop: Closed session
    Contact Geraldine at gfauvill@stanford.edu if interested

  • Room 302
    Sean McKenna, Seacoast Science Center
    Marine mammals: Making waves
    Join a member of a local Marine Mammal Rescues Team to explore the threats and challenges they face responding to stranded seals, dolphins, porpoises and whales. What are the importance of these species to our local ecosystem? How can we work together to conserve marine mammal populations in the Gulf of Maine?
    All Audiences

  • Room 330
    John Baek, NOAA Office of Education with Jenny East, Diana Payne, Patrick Wells, and Joanna Philippoff
    Help shape education research to include marine education and ocean literacy: You're invited
    The NMEA Education Research and Evaluation Committee invites NMEA members to participate in a discussion about what the field knows about teaching and learning. We are interested in hearing the questions you have that are most important to you. The ideas and questions raised in this session will help inform the Committee to engage education researchers to help us think about how their work can be applied to ocean and coastal contexts.
    All Audiences

  • Room 332
    Ren Bettencourt, Bow Seat Ocean Awareness Programs
    Using art to spark a deeper understanding of climate change
    Art-making is a powerful way to engage students in learning, help students connect with nature, and support students in processing difficult topics such as climate change. In this interactive workshop, we will model strategies to inspire conversation about climate change using student artwork from Bow Seat’s Ocean Awareness Contest. Participants will also take part in an art-making activity, designed to help students explore the science of climate change both intellectually and emotionally.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Informal Educators

  • Room 334
    Carol Hopper, Virginia Institute of Marine Science with Celia Cackowski and Sarah Nuss
    Fish fangs, microplastics, and moving mud: Graduate-level research translated for the K-12 classroom
    What do fish fangs reveal about annual cycles in a wolf eel’s life? What types of microplastics circulate in ocean gyres? Can moving mud tell tales? Graduate students at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science have translated their research into hands-on STEM activities for K-12 science classrooms. This session shares inventive activities with real-world connections. Participants receive these three lesson plans and have on-line access to others at https://tinyurl.com/VASEA-Lessons.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Informal Educators

  • Room 336
    Christine Bird, Oceanic Research Group with Gretchyn A. Gallagher
    Blue world: From ocean to classroom
    This session will give participants an overview of a STEM lesson from the Oceanic Research Group. The audience will view Jonathan Bird’s Blue World Whale Sharks video, participate in one of the student activities of the lesson, and analyze the results. We will also discuss how versatile Oceanic Research Group’s lessons can be adjusted for different student populations and various levels within the same class.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Informal Educators

  • Room 338
    Cassie Stymiest, Educational Passages with Holly Blair
    How far will it sail? Using miniboats as a tool for ocean exploration in the classroom and beyond
    Discover the ocean like never before by building and launching your very own miniature sailboat (“miniboat”) and following its GPS track as it sails across the sea. Your miniboat becomes a hands-on tool for exploring science, math, art, communication, and teamwork. Learn how you can engage your students, school, and community throughout the year and connect with people all around the world by integrating an Educational Passages miniboat into your program.
    All Audiences

  • Room 340
    Tracy Crews, Oregon Sea Grant with Hannah Nolan
    Meeting NGSS Science and Engineering Practices using the next generation of research vessels
    In this hands-on session, we will highlight activities and educational resources related to the new National Science Foundation funded Regional Class Research Vessels. Participants will learn how to meet the NGSS Science & Engineering Practices while also engaging their students in career-connected learning. We will share a variety of engaging activities and present strategies using real time data with students.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Informal Educators

  • Theater II
    Susan Haynes, NOAA OER/Collabralink Technologies with Debi Blaney
    Exploring the deep ocean with NOAA: A dive into our most amazing recent discoveries
    Ocean exploration spans the globe, discovering never before seen worlds in the deep sea. NOAA’s Office of Ocean Exploration and Research expands the reach of ocean exploration, frequently making discoveries completely new to the human race and to science. This session will dive into intriguing recent discoveries from the Atlantic, as well as activities and multimedia resources developed to help integrate ocean science into classroom instruction.
    All Audiences

  • Granite State Room: Briefing sessions (three 15 minute sessions)
    Wellsley Costello, NH Sea Grant & Cooperative Extension
    Science by the people, for the people
    Engaging youth and adult learners in authentic research and stewardship experiences is a powerful method to increase scientific learning. This presentation will detail the Coastal Research Volunteer (CRV) program impacts in terms of both on the ground accomplishments and our formal and informal education efforts to engage students in learning about coastal. In addition, we will share the range of services we can provide to help others develop their own sustainable citizen science programs.
    All Audiences

    Chih-Hsuan Chang, National Taiwan Ocean University with Cheng-Chieh Chang
    A pilot exploration of heart rate variability and creative thinking responses to ocean virtual reality imagery
    This study measured heart-rate variability (HRV) and creative thinking to explore whether Ocean Virtual Reality Imagery (OVRI) could facilitate a positive change toward mindfulness. We explored existing different kind of Ocean Virtual Reality films, designed two specific OVRI interventions. This quasi-experimental study with a control group was designed and still, in progress, we found the immersive Ocean Virtual Reality experiences with meditation, have preliminary efficacy for eliciting positive states to facilitate HRV and creative thinking.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Researchers (scientific or educational)

    Teresa Crean, University of Rhode Island Coastal Resources Center & Rhode Island Sea Grant
    Workforce development through experiential learning - Designing an Integrated Coastal Resilience Capstone Studio for undergraduates
    Rhode Island Sea Grant has supported undergraduate experiential learning studios focused on coastal adaptation and resiliency planning for the past five years at the University of Rhode Island. These studios encourage collaboration among students from ocean engineering, landscape architecture, and resource economics to address coastal resilience design and planning challenges that Rhode Island municipalities are facing real time. The result? URI’s students are entering the job market with a unique and applicable set of skills.
    College Instructors, Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

Wednesday, July 24, Session 2, 11:00-11:45 am
  • Room 162
    Olivia Wood, Loveland Living Planet Aquarium
    Aquariums - Not just for fish: Engaging communities to build and support our mission
    When you think of those who build and participate in the success of an aquarium, the field of marine sciences tends to come to mind. But who else makes our institutions and missions possible? No matter our background, or the circumstances of our guests, we are ALL part of our Living Planet and are ALL connected to the fate of our oceans and ecosystems and must act together to Turn the Tide.
    All Audiences

  • Room 164
    Geraldine Fauville
    VR Workshop: Closed session
    Contact Geraldine at gfauvill@stanford.edu if interested

  • Room 302
    Pamela Lynch, SCCC
    You are what you eat: KNOW seafood or NO seafood! (teaching the basics of fisheries sustainability)
    Sustainability, a main conference theme this year, is the single largest "buzzword" in marine sciences today. This lecture will address sustainability as it pertains to seafood - from selection to consumption - you are what you eat and your choice matters for your own health and the sustainability of our global Ocean. This lecture will be hands on and will highlight current seafood regulations, cutting edge fisheries management and the nationally recognized Seafood Watch program.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Government Agencies

  • Room 330
    Kimberly Dixon, National Aquarium with Symone Johnson
    Creating a pathway to future environmental educators
    In this session Symone Johnson, Urban Education Coordinator of the National Aquarium will talk about the trials and successes of the National Aquarium All About Water Program, where teen work study employees become environmental educators for middle schoolers throughout Baltimore City.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Informal Educators

  • Room 332
    Hannah MacDonald, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
    Moving the scale from knowledge to behavior change to resource protection
    The NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries has initiated an institutional approach to documenting the impacts of our education programs. All 14 sites have been asked to report on both outputs and outcomes, using common metrics and instruments. Simultaneously, some of our education programs are being evaluated to determine the economic impact of their environmental stewardship activities.
    All Audiences

  • Room 334
    Kate Leavitt, Seacoast Science Center with Mike Doherty
    Cit sci on the fly
    Join informal educators from a seaside marine science center to learn their tips and tricks for engaging the general public, campers, and school groups in citizen science. Why is citizen science so important, how can you employ it at your institution, and what are some ways to give your participants agency to go further and create their own investigative questions? We will explore these questions and you will leave with practical ideas, lessons, and resources.
    Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Researchers (scientific or educational)

  • Room 338
    Emily Sherman, Dover Public Schools
    Our wet footprint: Teaching about human impacts on marine ecosystems
    Explore how human activities and technology have affected marine ecosystems since the Industrial Revolution, and how global population growth has accelerated the environmental impacts on our bodies of water. Engage in a hands-on simulations and discussion for use in the classroom or nature center. Receive electronic lesson plans and links to online tools.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Informal Educators

  • Room 340
    Julie Silverman, Summit2Shore Consulting/HAWX Open Ocean with Graham Hawkes, Andrew Thaler, Jake Levenson, and Sam Kelly
    Empowering a community of ocean explorers through accessible tools and technology
    Join the ocean exploration revolution. Learn how ultra-low cost, easy-to-use, open-source, DIY tools now make exploring the ocean possible for everyone from students and ocean enthusiasts to citizen scientists and researchers. STEM ocean projects such as Sea Rocket and OpenCTD create limitless opportunities for making, research and reliable data collection and sharing. HAWX Open Ocean, Oceanography for Everyone and Conservation X Labs and Oceans Forward are part of a community that is hacking ocean exploration.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

  • Granite State Room: Briefing sessions (three 15 minute sessions)
    Craig Strang, Lawrence Hall of Science
    Professional learning resources for teaching science outdoors
    Field instructors who teach science outdoors have a unique opportunity to provide students with high impact, memorable learning experiences beyond what is possible in classrooms. Outdoor educators have not had access, however, to high quality professional learning designed for their context. Come experience student-centered and nature-centered practices, and learn about free professional learning resources for leaders and student activities for field instructors from the BEETLES Project at Lawrence Hall of Science.
    All Audiences, PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

  • Theater II
    Brian Soash, Science Friday with Ariel Zych, Megan Cook, and Kelly Moran
    E/V Nautilus and Science Friday, live from American Samoa!
    With a live ship-to-shore interaction from E/V Nautilus on the far side of the world, learn what the Ocean Exploration Trust’s team of deep-sea scientists, engineers, and educators is exploring in their 2019 expedition. After the interaction, learn about free STEM educator resources from the Ocean Exploration Trust and Science Friday to implement current research, career role modeling, and ocean data in your classroom today.
    All Audiences

Wednesday, July 24, Poster Session, 3:45-4:45 pm
  • Noriko Imamiya, Marine Learning Center; Akiko Tsuzuki
    Coral Territory Wars: Educational program for teaching and learning about coral reef ecosystems and the impacts on it
    We developed a hands-on educational program “Coral Territory Wars” to teach and learn the influence of growth constraints on the coral reef ecosystem through simulating its changes across the ages. In this presentation, we introduce the background of this program’s development, the characteristics of the program’s design, the learning flow of the program, and implementations in various educational opportunities.
    All Audiences

  • Jennifer Kennedy, Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation; Cynthia McInnis, Katie Pelon
    Booth in a Box: An innovative tool to educate about Right Whales
    The Year of the Right Whale is a project that protects North Atlantic right whales through celebration, education and action. The project consists of social media outreach, events and fundraising initiatives to engage the public in learning about right whales and supporting recovery efforts. A key strategy used in this campaign is the innovative “Booth in a Box.” This presentation will showcase the Booth in a Box and how it can be used in organizations.
    PreK - 5 Teachers (Elementary), 6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), College Instructors, Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Government Agencies

  • Cristin Krasco, The Nature Conservancy
    The Center for Conservation Initiatives (CCI): Advancing conservation through education, outreach, science, and stewardship across landscapes & generations
    The poster will highlight The Nature Conservancy Florida Chapter's new program, the Center for Conservation Initiatives. The Center is dedicated to increasing outreach, education, training, and research across the Conservancy's four flagship preserves in Florida.
    College Instructors, Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

  • Anne Smrcina, Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary
    STEM to STEAM: The beauty of biodiversity
    The ocean is filled with a diverse array of amazing creatures, and students have been demonstrating that in the annual marine art contest sponsored by Massachusetts Marine Educators and Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary. We will look at how both art and science learning objectives can be approached by studying and drawing local marine species.
    All Audiences

  • Sandra Huynh, Grand Bay NERR with Dennis McGrury
    Conceptualizing Human Alteration and Natural Growth in Estuaries and Savannas (CHANGES): Year 1
    The Grand Bay NERR’s CHANGES program will support the development of environmental literacy and stewardship in future generations and supply direct exposure to the real-world work of natural resource managers using student-centered, field-based education. In this poster presentation, the NMEA audience will learn about the program, its progress within its first year, and the evaluation process in the curriculum development.
    9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Informal Educators, Resource Managers, Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

  • Chuck Getter, Career Tech High School
    Using drones to monitor whale migration: A secondary school marine studies curriculum
    High school student pilots participated in Sea Grant shipboard programs acting as pilots and aerial photographers in support of NMFS licensed whale researcher, learning STEM concepts and CTE skills associated with aviation science, marine studies, and shipboard operations.
    6 - 8 Teachers (Middle School), 9 - 12 Teachers (High School), Researchers (scientific or educational), Government Agencies

  • Tsuyoshi Sasaki, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology
    Current issues or challenges in marine education
    In order to carry out Aquatic Marine environmental education in regional and school education in Japan, a mechanism to promote outreach activities in specialized universities and other institutions is essential. However, the recruitment and placement of human resources to promote outreach activities are not sufficient. In this research, based on the activity policy of Philippine Association of Extension Program implementation, the question items for evaluating outreach activities were created and outreach activities were evaluated.
    All Audiences

  • Piper Bartlett-Browne, St. Thomas Aquinas
    Northern Chukchi Integrated Study: An observational research program evaluating changes in the Pacific Arctic ecosystem in response to sea ice declines and other climate related processes
    The approach is to undertake repeat sampling of specific locations that are biologically diverse or rich in production to detect change, and also to use the capabilities aboard the USCGC Healy to undertake process oriented experiments that address specific issues such as ocean acidification, changes in biological productivity and other areas of sampling that can be addressed by shipboard sampling and experimentation. They will be ship-based aboard the USCGC Healy in the northern Bering and Chukchi Seas.
    All Audiences


If you are interested in viewing presentation criteria, please view our archived information.

Archived Presentation Criteria

Concurrent Sessions are the heart of NMEA Conference programming. We invite educators, researchers, explorers, writers, artists, conservation managers, and anyone with a passion for the World of Water to share that passion through a conference concurrent session. Sessions at the 2019 Conference will align with the conference theme - TURNING THE TIDE: LEARNING FROM YESTERDAY, ADAPTING FOR TOMORROW. Speakers should propose sessions that support the following sub-themes:

LESSONS FROM THE PAST
Sessions in this sub-theme will address “tried and true” tools and methodologies for marine education from the past. The sessions should include detailed descriptions of the tool or method, an analysis of why they worked, and what lesson for current or future marine education it provides. Specific contexts or programs should be used to address this sub-theme.

CURRENT ISSUES OR CHALLENGES IN MARINE EDUCATION
Sessions in this sub-theme should identify and address current issues or challenges in marine education. The session should identify the specific issue or challenge, examine why it is an issue or challenge, and how it is being, or should be, addressed.

TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES FOR TOMORROW
Sessions in this sub-theme should look to the future and identify current or future tools or techniques for successful marine education. The session should justify the future view that the tool or technique is addressing, how it addresses the future view, and the nature of the tool itself

In addition to the main sub-themes, proposed sessions should specify a target audience and address one or more of the following topics:

  • Ocean and/or climate literacy principles

  • Current research

  • Connecting art, culture, and science

2019 Session Formats
Full Session: One or more presenters speaking on one topic related to the sub-theme for that day of the conference, audience Q&A optional. Sessions are 45 minutes.

Briefing Session: One speaker each limited to twelve-minute presentations with a few minutes for questions, grouped by topic within the sub-theme of the day of the conference.

Student Session: One or more presenters speaking on a topic during the Wednesday, July 24th student conference. Presentations can be geared to any of the sub-themes of the conference. Audience Q and A is optional. Sessions are 45 minutes.

Poster Session: Posters will be accepted and a designated time will be identified for presenting posters.

Important Dates
January 21, 2019 - Call for presentation and poster proposals open March 15, 2019 - Call for presentation and poster proposals closes April 1, 2019 - Tentative date to notify accepted presentations and posters

Requirements of Session and Poster Presenters All presenters must:

  • Register for the conference.

  • Advise if their presentation includes a product or products for sale.

  • Supply their own computer, laptop, or tablet. Apple users must also provide the appropriate VGA adapter for an LCD projector.

  • Identify audio-visual and Internet availability needs.

  • Provide their own hard copies of materials to be distributed if not using an electronic means of distribution. Digital and electronic copies are preferred.

  • Provide any other materials necessary to make their presentation.

All presentations must fit either a 45-minute or a 15-minute time frame.