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Guest Blog by Anne Stewart: CaNOE's role in the global ocean literacy movement

Posted By Jeannette Connors, Tuesday, November 14, 2017

In the first of a three-part series, CaNOE's (Canadian Network for Ocean Education) Co-chair Anne Stewart explains CaNOE's place in the global ocean literacy movement.

CaNOE works to advance ocean literacy in Canada, but not in isolation. CaNOE, and Canadians, benefit by connecting to the global ocean literacy groundswell that is gaining momentum and imbuing ocean optimism.

Internationally, CaNOE has links to networks like the National Marine Educators Association (NMEA) in the USA, and the European Marine Science Educators Association (EMSEA). These are professional associations, which, like CaNOE, aspire to an ocean literate citizenry: people who understand the ocean’s influence on us and our influence on the ocean. Ocean literate citizens can also communicate about the ocean in meaningful ways and make informed and responsible decisions regarding the ocean’s well being and its gifts. NMEA is the oldest (40+years) and largest of these organizations, and is a primary proponent of the collaborative and evolving ocean literacy framework. CaNOE and EMSEA are of a similar young age, both arising around the time of the Galway Statement.

The tripartite Galway Statement – signed by the USA, EU and Canada in 2013 – placed ocean literacy as a foundational and crosscutting theme for transatlantic research cooperation. The signing was followed in Europe by substantial financial commitments to the ocean literacy projects Sea Change and ResponSEAble, both funded through Blue Growth, Horizon 2020. These projects are also buoyed by the Atlantic Ocean Research Alliance – Coordination and Support Action Project (AORA-CSA). The implementation of the Galway Statement is achieved internationally through AORA with senior tripartite leadership and through tripartite working groups that collaborate on areas of identified mutual cooperation.

Transatlantic cooperation in the Galway sense refers both to the North Atlantic with its Arctic interactions, and to the tripartite countries, unions, and seas on both sides of the North Atlantic. In Canada, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans and Canadian Coast Guard (DFOCCG) leads and consults nationally throughout the year with the Galway Canadian Marine Working Group. Chairs and co-chairs of identified areas of co-operation also work internationally with their respective AORA working groups. (To help visualize AORA and how it works, see the image below.)

The Trilateral Galway Implementation Committee tasked the AORA Ocean Literacy working group to also work with AORA Aquaculture and AORA Seabed Mapping working groups and to advance the G7 Ministers’ action on plastic in the ocean. With so much going on, the AORA Ocean Literacy working group recently expanded to include leadership from NMEA, EMSEA and CaNOE. This was formalized through a unanimous recommendation by the AORA Ocean Literacy Working Group Co-leads in their contribution to the Galway “Golden Paper” accepted by Galway Implementation Leadership. This formalizes bottom up, as well as top down participation, in boosting ocean literacy across the Atlantic by assuring participation of individuals who are well immersed, dedicated to, and fluently conversant in the drive towards ocean literacy.

The current AORA Ocean Literacy working group has collaborated for four years, since formative transatlantic ocean literacy workshops were held in the UK, Belgium, Sweden and Portugal. CaNOE was there for the entire voyage in its frail little craft, crewed solely by volunteers. There was no funding or travel support from Canada and it was only through the generosity of the European Commission, Portugal, EMSEA, NMEA and AORA-CSA that CaNOE volunteers were able to participate at the transatlantic ocean literacy table. From the inception of the idea of transatlantic ocean literacy, Canada has been involved via CaNOE.

- CaNOE Co-chair Anne Stewart

In November, 2017 CaNOE co-chair was joined by Tara Donaghy, appointed by Fisheries and Oceans and Canadian Coast Guard. Tara is well positioned to make a really positive difference to the future of collaborations and a very warm welcome is extended.

Tags:  EMSEA  guest blog  ocean education  Ocean Literacy 

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Guest Blog by Tami Lunsford: Attending the Blue Vision Summit

Posted By Lisa D. Tossey, Tuesday, June 20, 2017
Updated: Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Tami Lunsford at Blue SummitI was proud to represent National Marine Educators Association at the Blue Vision Summit in Washington D.C. on May 9-11. Thank you to all of the members who helped support the trip financially. It was a new foray for NMEA and we appreciate knowing that it was valued and considered a positive move by our members.

Blue Vision was an incredible event organized by Blue Frontier filled with informative sessions on the issues most pressing for our world ocean today, ideas on how to help improve those issues, and action on Capitol Hill. As I am from the small state of Delaware, I was able to join the delegation that met with individuals from all three of our legislators (two senators and one representative). It was empowering and inspirational to see the motivation of the individuals who traveled from across the US to participate in the event.

The highlight of the event for many of us was to see the youth engagement. Led primarily by our indomitable Sean Russell, the young people continue to show us all how they can use their energy, enthusiasm, insight, and passion to make a positive difference in the world.... many of them before they even graduate high school! Our work in convincing our national leaders about the value and importance of the ocean is clearly not over, but this was a strong positive step and I am honored to have been part of it through NMEA.

- Tami Lunsford, 2016-17 NMEA President

Tags:  guest blog 

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Guest Blog by the Ocean Literacy Committee: Join our winter ocean literacy webinar series!

Posted By Lisa D. Tossey, Monday, November 21, 2016
Updated: Monday, November 28, 2016

The NMEA Ocean Literacy Committee is hosting a three-part webinar series. Each webinar will cover a different topic and topics will build on the one prior.

Current Special Report coverWebinar 1:
Tuesday, January 17

Exploring and Applying the Ocean Literacy Scope and Sequence for Grades K–12

11:30 a.m. HST/1:30 p.m. PST/4:30 p.m. EST

This interactive webinar will engage participants in opportunities to explore the Ocean Literacy Scope and Sequence for Grades K–12. We will discuss how to apply these grade-level appropriate conceptual progressions, designed to increase Ocean Literacy, to the development of learning experiences and instructional materials for use in K–12 classrooms, informal environments, and professional learning opportunities for educators.

Presented by:

  • Catherine Halversen, Lawrence Hall of Science at UC Berkeley
  • Craig Strang, Lawrence Hall of Science at UC Berkeley
  • Lynn Tran, Lawrence Hall of Science at UC Berkeley
  • Lynn Whitley, Wrigley Institute of Environmental Studies, University of Southern California

Duration: 90 minutes

NOTE: During this webinar, we suggest participants have ready access to the conceptual flow diagram we will investigate, a copy of which can be found here >

UPDATE (1/25): View a recording of this webinar here > 

Ocean Literacy alignmentWebinar 2:
Thursday, February 9

Alignment of the Ocean Literacy Framework with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)

10:30 a.m. HST/12:30 p.m. PST/3:30 p.m. EST

This webinar will build your familiarity and understanding of the Ocean Literacy - NGSS alignment tool. We will first describe why alignment of the Ocean Literacy Framework with NGSS is needed, and explain the rating scale used to describe the different relationships between the Ocean Literacy Principles and the Disciplinary Core Ideas that comprise the Next Generation Science Standards. Participants will explore the alignment tool through the examination of particular grade bands, Ocean Literacy Principles and DCIs, along with the ratings explanations provided by a panel of experts. We will discuss your observations, questions and ideas for how to use the alignment document.

Presented by:

  • Sarah Pedamonte, Lawrence Hall of Science at UC Berkeley
  • Craig Strang, Lawrence Hall of Science at UC Berkeley
  • Lynn Whitley, Wrigley Institute of Environmental Studies, University of Southern California

NOTE: During this webinar, we suggest participants have ready access to the alignment documents, as well as a copy of the NGSS and the Ocean Literacy Scope and Sequence.

Prior to this webinar, we recommend you watch this video introduction to the NGSS in NSTA’s Learning Center if you are not familiar with the Next Generation Science Standards.

Duration: 60 minutes

UPDATE (2/19): View a recording of this webinar here > 

Instructions for Viewers: 
Please note that at several points during this webinar you will want to pause the recording to explore the alignment documents yourself. The recorded webinar has been edited to eliminate the time periods when we gave participants an opportunity to review these documents before moving on to the next part of the presentation.

 

Ocean Literacy guideWebinar 3:
Thursday, February 23

Organizing for Ocean Literacy - Implementation at Different Scales

8:00 a.m. HST/10:00 a.m. PST/1:00 p.m. EST

Join us for examples of how educators, scientists, and policy makers have deployed the Ocean Literacy Framework and the Ocean Literacy/NGSS Alignment document. We will focus on moving from ideas to impact by looking at examples of Ocean Literacy-inspired curricula, non-formal programs with a focus on Ocean Literacy, and how the alignment of NGSS with Ocean Literacy can be leveraged to support funding efforts, strategic planning activity, and teacher professional learning. Our format includes ample time for collegial conversation and questions, so please plan to join us!

Presented by:

  • Kurt Holland, Lead Science Communicator, Broader Impacts West
  • Diana Payne, Connecticut Sea Grant
  • Sarah Schoedinger, NOAA Office of Education

Duration: 60 minutes

Join using this link >

Instructions to Participants:
Please join the webinar a few minutes early to ensure you are able to see and hear the presenters. You will NOT need login credentials to join. The meeting host will accept your entry into the meeting room at the start of the webinar.

UPDATE (3/7): View a recording of this webinar here > 

- Sarah Schoedinger, Diana Payne, and Craig Strang, NMEA Ocean Literacy Committee

Tags:  guest blog  Ocean Literacy 

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Guest Blog by Elaine Brewer: Ocean Literacy Summit

Posted By Lisa D. Tossey, Thursday, November 17, 2016

Ocean Literacy SummitEvery two years, the New England Ocean Science Education Collaborative hosts an Ocean Literacy Summit; a day in which individuals gather together to learn new ways to spread knowledge about the ocean to their local communities. This November, the Ocean Literacy Summit was held at the University of Southern Maine in Portland, Maine. The theme this year was Ocean Literacy Principle 3: the ocean is a major influence on weather and the climate.

Dr. Andy Pershing opened the event with a relevant keynote addressing what the warming of the Gulf of Maine means for everyone, especially those of us who live around its waters. The two sessions of lightning talks—timed five-minute talks with 10 slides automatically advancing every 30 seconds—were as invigorating as they were informative. The panel on climate change education, moderated by Ari Daniel, was encouraging to everyone in the audience.

This year’s Summit had two additional new events. Interspersed throughout the day, participants could speak with educators at the Marine Education Fair. To close the Summit, participants were encouraged to sit and speak with presenters about the topics that intrigued them the most at the Concluding Café.

Ocean Literacy Summit For those who could join earlier, additional activities were held the day before the Summit. The National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation held an insightful workshop on how to empower people with information on climate change. Dr. Bob Chen from the University of Massachusetts, Boston held a Broader Impacts workshop showing individuals different ways to reach their audiences. During the evening, the Gulf of Maine Marine Education Association hosted the welcome reception at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute, introducing Summit participants to Peterson Toscano, a comedian with an ability to shed some humorous light on the heavy topic of climate change.

Throughout the Summit, marine scientists shared their latest findings while educators shared how they teach about climate change. Participants were encouraged to share their own insights during the Summit on social media with the event hashtag #OLSummit16. All posts can be viewed on Storify here >

- Elaine Brewer, NMEA Communications Pod and Social Media Chair

Tags:  guest blog  Ocean Literacy 

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Guest Blog by Robert Rocha: EMSEA 2015 in Crete

Posted By Lisa D. Tossey, Monday, December 21, 2015

The third annual European Marine Science Educators Association (EMSEA) conference was held from September 28 through October 1, 2015, at the CretAquarium in Gournes, Crete. More than 100 people from 22 countries attended this great event. The conference focused on two topics: evaluating actions and methods as well as their impact on diverse audiences, including schools and aquaria; looking ahead into the future and shaping ‘the way forward’ for ocean literacy in Europe and beyond. Workshops were well run and well attended.

EMSEA 2015

Social events included a roof-top ice breaker, and one night later a tour, dinner and traditional Cretan dancing at an open-air museum. Pierre-Yves Cousteau gave an inspiring keynote lecture and, to end the conference, attendees very enthusiastically, and very generously, participated in Aquarium Bingo, as a means of raising scholarship funds for EMSEA 2016.

EMSEA 2015

NMEA was well represented with fifteen members in attendance. Several, including Ivar Babb, Tina Bishop, Evy Copejans, Geraldine Fauville, Susan Haynes, Meg Marrero, Diana Payne, Gail Scowcroft, Craig Strang, Peter Tuddenham, and I, led workshops and/or poster sessions.

EMSEA 2015

An interesting and successful format for sharing information was the Open Space Discussion. Everybody in attendance gathered in one large room and were encouraged to offer topics of discussion by writing them on a sticky note, ‘selling’ the topic to the crowd and choosing a time to lead the talk. Once the topics were posted, attendees could choose one for the first time slot and another for the second time slot. According to the rules, ‘Whoever shows up is the right amount of people for that group and whatever takes place is the only thing that could have happened.’ Personally, I enjoyed the Open Space Discussion about finding international ways of celebrating the 500th anniversary of Magellan’s voyage.

EMSEA 2015

Congratulations to conference chair Martha Papathanassiou, the EMSEA team, the staffs of the Hellenic Center for Marine Research and the CretAquarium for a successful and informative conference. Mark your calendars for the fourth EMSEA conference, scheduled for October 4-7, 2016 in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

- Robert Rocha, 2015-16 NMEA President

Tags:  conference  EMSEA  guest blog 

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Guest blog by Meghan Marrero - Our Ocean in Your Hands: From Science to Solutions

Posted By Lisa D. Tossey, Thursday, December 17, 2015
Ocean Webinar Flyer

How can you inspire students to seek solution to real-world problems in our world’s ocean? How can you students get their questions answered by people already making a difference? Join us for Our Ocean in Your Hands: From Science to Solutions, live webinar that will be held January 22, 2016, at 1 p.m. EST/10 a.m. PST.

This webinar, featuring Dr. Edie Widder, Anna Cummins, and myself, will inspire students to critically examine current issues, such as plastic pollution in the ocean, and consider action steps for positive change. Students will see and hear the scientists and their slide presentations, and get an opportunity to ask questions.

Registration is free, but limited to the first 50 classrooms that sign up. The webinar will be geared toward middle and high school students who are ready to make a difference. Registered classrooms will receive preparation materials at least 1 week before the webinar. Login information will be sent at least 48 hours prior to the event. The easiest way to participate is by using your computer with speakers and projector or SmartBoard. Register today >

This special event is co-sponsored by NMEA, WINGS Worldquest, ORCA, and the 5-Gyres Institute.

Learn more about our panelists:

Edith WidderDr. Edith Widder is a MacArthur Fellow, a deep-sea explorer, ocean conservationist and Wings Fellow. A specialist in bioluminescence, she has been a leader in developing new ways to explore the deep sea. Her innovations have produced footage of rare sharks, squid, jellyfish, and crustaceans, as well as led to the first recordings of the giant squid, Architeuthis, in its natural habitat. In order to help save and protect the ocean she loves, in 2005 Edie helped found the Ocean Research & Conservation Association, also known as ORCA. ORCA is the world’s first technology focused, marine conservation, not-for-profit, which is using leading-edge scieince to find pollution and stop it at its source. ORCA’s tagline, which is Mapping Pollution, Finding Solutions, describes a results-driven approach to meeting some of the greatest challenges our ocean planet is currently facing.

Anna CumminsAnna Cummins has over 15 years of experience in environmental non-profit work, education, writing, and campaign development. She has worked in marine conservation, coastal watershed management, sustainability education, and high school ecology instruction. Anna received her undergraduate in History from Stanford University, and her Masters in International Environmental Policy from the Monterey Institute for International Studies. In 2008, Anna completed a month long, 4,000-mile research expedition studying plastic debris in the North Pacific Gyre. The journey inspired the launch of 5 Gyres. Anna was elected a fellow of the Wings World Quest in 2011, and received a Golden Goody Award in 2013.

View or share our flyer >

- Meghan Marrero is an Associate Professor of Secondary Science Education at Mercy College and currently serves on the NMEA Board of Directors 

Photo credits: Widder, courtesy of TED and Cummins, courtesy of 5-Gyres Institute

Tags:  guest blog  webinar 

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Guest Blog by Kate Wade: Connecting to the Community

Posted By Lisa D. Tossey, Saturday, April 11, 2015
Informal education -seining

There used to only be two ways to reach classroom students as an informal educator: site visits and field trips. These methods have changed. Technology provides us with the ability to enhance these experiences with lessons, discussions, and follow-ups all conducted online. This isn’t a new thing, but it is quickly becoming a more common approach to informal education experiences.

In a time when classroom budgets and lessons are severely restricted, informal educators now have a tool that allows them to squeeze in extra time with students and provide additional enrichment experiences. Not only are educators able to reach the target audience in a more efficient way, but they are also able to connect with one another like never before.

The National Marine Education Association supports and fosters the connection between the classroom and the informal educator and is dedicated to reaching a larger audience. A common component of the 2014 NMEA conference was the importance of communication and the connections and experiences made possible by technology. There is a trend among government organizations, private institutions and local non-profit groups towards the use of social media and video conferencing as a means of reaching target audiences.

Various social media platforms provide the opportunity for organizations to contact and notify an audience outside of their local area. Not only is it an essential tool for educators, the access and connectivity that social media creates is a valuable marketing strategy for many of these institutions. Educators are often a naturally collaborative and communicative community; sharing and creating meaningful connections is important professionally and personally. The connections made through online technology between educators, organizations, and schools are changing the landscape of outreach education.

Technology

Organizations across the country offer quality educational experiences throughout the year; yet many schools fail to participate in programming. Online educational opportunities allow informal educators to share lessons, experiments, or experiences with students who may not be able to attend programming due to location or budget constraints. Many informal educational groups are specifically designing programming for presenting online; communicating scientific ideas and developing meaningful cognitive experiences using videos, experiments, and presentations conducted in real-time.

This approach increases the likelihood that students located in communities that have insufficient funding will have the opportunity to participate in programming without the added cost of travel and valuable time away from the classroom. School districts that have limited access to marine science programs due to location are no longer inhibited by distance; students are able to participate in marine science in real-time, virtual classrooms. Online educational programming provides students with access to the marine science community in a new format.

By changing our approach, online technology has given informal educators a means to share our story and our experiences with our target audience. To reach a wide range of audiences we must share the possibilities of online learning experiences and encourage the use social media to increase awareness and improve communication between science organizations and school districts. Information regarding grant funded opportunities, outreach programming, and classroom curriculum will increase the probability of a schools’ participation. The ultimate goal is to connect to classrooms across the country and provide students with marine science experiences and knowledge. To truly expand our audience, we must use online tools of communication to reach those who do not have access to marine science education.

Author Kate Wade was a 2014 Expanding Audiences scholarship recipient. Learn more about the scholarship here > 

 

Tags:  conference  guest blog  scholarship 

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