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AMEA Call for special issue of “Marine education in Asia”

Posted By Jennifer Magnusson, Thursday, February 22, 2018

AMEA LogoIn order to strengthen Asia’s regional marine education academic research, enhance interaction from marine educators, communicate research outcomes, and extend the influence of global marine education, the Asia Marine Educators Association (AMEA) established a research committee in 2017 and decided to publish an academic journal. The first publication will be the special issue of Higher Education Research of Ocean University of China (HEROUC). The first special issue call for topics includes:

  1. Marine education theory research
  2. Academic marine education activities research
  3. National or regional marine education practices
  4. National or regional marine education comparative research
  5. Ocean literacy or marine education evaluation research
  6. National or regional marine education curriculum
  7. National or regional marine education policy
  8. Other research related to marine education or ocean literacy

We expect the first AMEA publication to showcase information about Asia’s marine education, and inspire educators to exchange knowledge about promoting marine education in their countries. This special issue is estimated to comprise 10-12 papers on marine education practices and policy from different countries, and will be printed as hard copies. We will share the journal at the 2018 NMEA conference in Long Beach, CA. The next step of the research committee is to establish the Asia Marine Education Journal, which will be formally announced at the 2019 AMEA conference in China.

For more information please see the website: https://goo.gl/QADHMH

Contact: AMEA secretary general Chia-Dai (Ray) Yen, hamrater@msn.com

Tags:  AMEA  international  Ocean Literacy 

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Guest Blog by Anne Stewart: CaNOE's role in the global ocean literacy movement

Posted By Jeannette Connors, Tuesday, November 14, 2017

In the first of a three-part series, CaNOE's (Canadian Network for Ocean Education) Co-chair Anne Stewart explains CaNOE's place in the global ocean literacy movement.

CaNOE works to advance ocean literacy in Canada, but not in isolation. CaNOE, and Canadians, benefit by connecting to the global ocean literacy groundswell that is gaining momentum and imbuing ocean optimism.

Internationally, CaNOE has links to networks like the National Marine Educators Association (NMEA) in the USA, and the European Marine Science Educators Association (EMSEA). These are professional associations, which, like CaNOE, aspire to an ocean literate citizenry: people who understand the ocean’s influence on us and our influence on the ocean. Ocean literate citizens can also communicate about the ocean in meaningful ways and make informed and responsible decisions regarding the ocean’s well being and its gifts. NMEA is the oldest (40+years) and largest of these organizations, and is a primary proponent of the collaborative and evolving ocean literacy framework. CaNOE and EMSEA are of a similar young age, both arising around the time of the Galway Statement.

The tripartite Galway Statement – signed by the USA, EU and Canada in 2013 – placed ocean literacy as a foundational and crosscutting theme for transatlantic research cooperation. The signing was followed in Europe by substantial financial commitments to the ocean literacy projects Sea Change and ResponSEAble, both funded through Blue Growth, Horizon 2020. These projects are also buoyed by the Atlantic Ocean Research Alliance – Coordination and Support Action Project (AORA-CSA). The implementation of the Galway Statement is achieved internationally through AORA with senior tripartite leadership and through tripartite working groups that collaborate on areas of identified mutual cooperation.

Transatlantic cooperation in the Galway sense refers both to the North Atlantic with its Arctic interactions, and to the tripartite countries, unions, and seas on both sides of the North Atlantic. In Canada, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans and Canadian Coast Guard (DFOCCG) leads and consults nationally throughout the year with the Galway Canadian Marine Working Group. Chairs and co-chairs of identified areas of co-operation also work internationally with their respective AORA working groups. (To help visualize AORA and how it works, see the image below.)

The Trilateral Galway Implementation Committee tasked the AORA Ocean Literacy working group to also work with AORA Aquaculture and AORA Seabed Mapping working groups and to advance the G7 Ministers’ action on plastic in the ocean. With so much going on, the AORA Ocean Literacy working group recently expanded to include leadership from NMEA, EMSEA and CaNOE. This was formalized through a unanimous recommendation by the AORA Ocean Literacy Working Group Co-leads in their contribution to the Galway “Golden Paper” accepted by Galway Implementation Leadership. This formalizes bottom up, as well as top down participation, in boosting ocean literacy across the Atlantic by assuring participation of individuals who are well immersed, dedicated to, and fluently conversant in the drive towards ocean literacy.

The current AORA Ocean Literacy working group has collaborated for four years, since formative transatlantic ocean literacy workshops were held in the UK, Belgium, Sweden and Portugal. CaNOE was there for the entire voyage in its frail little craft, crewed solely by volunteers. There was no funding or travel support from Canada and it was only through the generosity of the European Commission, Portugal, EMSEA, NMEA and AORA-CSA that CaNOE volunteers were able to participate at the transatlantic ocean literacy table. From the inception of the idea of transatlantic ocean literacy, Canada has been involved via CaNOE.

- CaNOE Co-chair Anne Stewart

In November, 2017 CaNOE co-chair was joined by Tara Donaghy, appointed by Fisheries and Oceans and Canadian Coast Guard. Tara is well positioned to make a really positive difference to the future of collaborations and a very warm welcome is extended.

Tags:  EMSEA  guest blog  ocean education  Ocean Literacy 

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Guest Blog by AMEA: The 2nd Asia Marine Educators Association Conference

Posted By Jeannette Connors, Wednesday, September 20, 2017

The 2nd Asia Marine Educators Association (AMEA) conference took place in Mariveles Bataan Philippines from Sep 5th to 10th, 2017. The theme of the conference from Sept 5th to 8th was summarized by 3Cs "Coordination, Collaboration, Cooperation (3Cs) Towards a Strong Marine Education" . The extended AMEA conference with the theme "Ocean Literacy for Marine Environmental Protection" was from Sept 9th to 10th. There were 23 international marine educators from 11 countries and over 200 local marine educators and maritime students who joined the various activities in the great event. It was after the first formal AMEA conference which took place in 2016 in Taiwan and functioned as the pre-conference for the 2017 AMEA conference. This conference took place over 4 days with an extended AMEA conference hosted by the University of Makati in cooperation with the University of Pasig, Maritime Academy of Asia and Pacific and the Philippine Association of Extension Program Implementers.

The conference coordinator Prof. Angelica Baylon, Ph.D. arranged various impressive activities including dinners hosted by various dignitaries to make the conference amazing. With the full support of MAAP President and AMEA adviser Dr. Prof. VAdm Eduardo Ma R Santos AFP (Ret), all the participants experienced real interactions with each other and had built fond memories during the six-day event. The conference includes 3 keynote speeches 6 countries marine education policy plenary sessions; a scientific workshop session; 20 paper presentations; poolside closing and awarding ceremonies; field trip to Bataan Tourism Center; Mt. Samat Museum; and seafood factory. After the conference and board meeting, Dr. Tsuyoshi Sasaki (Japan) will continue as the AMEA President until 2019. The secretary changes from Emily King (China) to Chia-Dai (Ray) Yen (Taiwan). The conference also made some milestones of AMEA history:

  1. The AMEA conference was endorsed to all HEIS in the Philippines by the Chair of the Philippine Commission on Higher Education (Chair Patricia B. Licuanan, PhD) represented by national marine scientist and CHEDHERRC Director Dr. Robert Pagulayan.
  2. Revision of a few AMEA bylaws and agreement upon the AMEA organizational structure. The new structure includes 3 board sub-committees for (1) conference (committee chair: Mo Chen from China), (2) research (committee chair: Yong Ma from China), and (3) education & training (committee chair: Chin Kuo Wu from Taiwan). The board membership increased by 2 new members of the council from Ocean University of China and Bangladesh Marine Academy to 8 countries totaling 15 board members.
  3. There were 23 international marine educators from 11 countries and over 200 local educators and students joined the conference.
  4. First scientific workshop by Dr. Douglas Levin of Washington College, USA.
  5. Registration fee that included 50 USD per delegate to contribute toward funding the conference attendance of 3 scholarships awardees.
  6. First discussion on the integration of maritime education and marine education.
  7. Live Video keynote speech from UNESCO specialist Dr. Francesca Santoro.
  8. Decision by the delegates to participate in the unified concurrent Clean Beach Carnival on October 14, 2017, 13:00-18:00 (GMT+8).

As regards extended AMEA activity – 4th PAEPI International Conference with Theme “Ocean Literacy for the Protection of the Environment“ hosted by the University of Makati in cooperation with the University of Pasig, the Philippine Extension Program Implementers and the Maritime Academy of Asia and the Pacific. The four AMEA Plenary presenters have provided information about AMEA and Ocean Literacy that inspired various marine institutions in the Philippines. The extended AMEA activity with AMEA Chair Dr. Tsuyoshi Sasaki presentation about the role of AMEA encouraged more than 80 higher educational institutions in the Philippines to link and become AMEA members.

- AMEA

Tags:  international  Ocean Literacy 

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Guest Blog: International Ocean Literacy Survey update

Posted By Lisa D. Tossey, Monday, March 20, 2017

We would like to provide everyone with an update on the progress we have made with the International Ocean Literacy Survey, and to once again thank everyone for their support and participation in this all-volunteer effort across 24 countries. 

We administered Version 2 of the survey last fall in order to test the survey items themselves to see if they functioned well individually and together as a survey. The survey was taken by almost 7,000 students ages 16-18 years old in 17 languages in 24 countries! We are impressed and optimistic at how well the survey performed.

The results in the infographic below are only for the Ocean Literacy knowledge portion of the survey. We are still analyzing the results for the attitude portion of the survey, and we will send those findings later this spring. (You can also download this infographic in PDF format here > )

OL Survey Infographic 1

OL Survey Infographic 2

OL Survey Infographic 3

Our next steps are:

  • If you helped us collect data by administering the survey in your country and would like to have access to your raw data, please contact us. We are currently working on developing a system to prep the data for you.
  • We will be convening an expert, international advisory panel to review and guide our efforts to ensure both the content validity and the statistical integrity of the work we are doing.
  • We will be revising and updating the survey based on the findings and the contributions from the advisory panel. Version 3 of the survey will be ready for the next round of testing by the beginning of the next academic year.

Again, we deeply appreciate everyone's help and are confident that together we will develop a valid, reliable, and valuable tool that can be used around the world to measure and inform our progress toward building an ocean literate society!

Craig Strang
Géraldine Fauville
Mac Cannady

Tags:  international  Ocean Literacy 

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NMEA Ocean Literacy Committee hosts three-part winter webinar series on Ocean Literacy

Posted By Lisa D. Tossey, Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Ocean Literacy guide

The NMEA Ocean Literacy Committee hosted a three-part webinar series this winter, with each webinar covering a different topic and the topics building on the one prior. Details for each webinar and links to recordings of them can be found below. 

Webinar 1: Exploring and Applying the Ocean Literacy Scope and Sequence for Grades K–12

View a recording of this webinar here > 

This interactive webinar engaged participants in opportunities to explore the Ocean Literacy Scope and Sequence for Grades K–12. It discussed how to apply these grade-level appropriate conceptual progressions, designed to increase Ocean Literacy, to the development of learning experiences and instructional materials for use in K–12 classrooms, informal environments, and professional learning opportunities for educators.

Presented by:

  • Catherine Halversen, Lawrence Hall of Science at UC Berkeley
  • Craig Strang, Lawrence Hall of Science at UC Berkeley
  • Lynn Tran, Lawrence Hall of Science at UC Berkeley
  • Lynn Whitley, Wrigley Institute of Environmental Studies, University of Southern California

Duration: 90 minutes

NOTE: During this webinar, it was suggested participants have ready access to a conceptual flow diagram that was investigated, a copy of which can be found here >

Webinar 2: Alignment of the Ocean Literacy Framework with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)

View a recording of this webinar here > 

This webinar built participant's familiarity and understanding of the Ocean Literacy - NGSS alignment tool. It described why alignment of the Ocean Literacy Framework with NGSS is needed, and explained the rating scale used to describe the different relationships between the Ocean Literacy Principles and the Disciplinary Core Ideas that comprise the Next Generation Science Standards. Participants explored the alignment tool through the examination of particular grade bands, Ocean Literacy Principles and DCIs, along with the ratings explanations provided by a panel of experts.

Presented by: 

  • Sarah Pedamonte, Lawrence Hall of Science at UC Berkeley
  • Craig Strang, Lawrence Hall of Science at UC Berkeley
  • Lynn Whitley, Wrigley Institute of Environmental Studies, University of Southern California

NOTE: During this webinar, we suggested participants have ready access to the alignment documents, as well as a copy of the NGSS and the Ocean Literacy Scope and Sequence.

Prior to this webinar, we recommended watching this video introduction to the NGSS in NSTA’s Learning Center if you are not familiar with the Next Generation Science Standards.

Duration: 60 minutes

Instructions for Viewers: 
Please note that at several points during this webinar you will want to pause the recording to explore the alignment documents yourself. The recorded webinar has been edited to eliminate the time periods when we gave participants an opportunity to review these documents before moving on to the next part of the presentation.

Webinar 3: Organizing for Ocean Literacy - Implementation at Different Scales

View a recording of this webinar here > 

This webinar provided examples of how educators, scientists, and policy makers have deployed the Ocean Literacy Framework and the Ocean Literacy/NGSS Alignment document. It focused on moving from ideas to impact by looking at examples of Ocean Literacy-inspired curricula, non-formal programs with a focus on Ocean Literacy, and how the alignment of NGSS with Ocean Literacy can be leveraged to support funding efforts, strategic planning activity, and teacher professional learning.

Presented by:

  • Kurt Holland, Lead Science Communicator, Broader Impacts West
  • Diana Payne, Connecticut Sea Grant
  • Sarah Schoedinger, NOAA Office of Education

Duration: 60 minutes 

Webinar organizers are interested in feedback on this webinar. After viewing it, please take a couple minutes to answer four brief questions.

Tags:  Ocean Literacy  webinar 

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Guest Blog by FMSEA: Registration now open for Ocean Literacy conference

Posted By Lisa D. Tossey, Monday, February 13, 2017

FMSEA OL Conference

We are happy to announce that registration for our conference, FMSEA 2017: FMSEA on the First Coast: Shining Light on Ocean Literacy,  is now open!

Please join us May 4-7 in Saint Augustine, Fla.  Our conference hotel is the Hampton Inn and Suites, Vilano Beach.  We have secured a rate of $164 a night, so please mention FMSEA when you make your reservation.

More information on the conference, including our annual award nominations, and scholarship applications can be found here > 

You can register for the conference here - be sure to register by March 31 to secure the early bird rate!

We can't wait to "sea" you there!

- FMSEA Board

Tags:  fmsea  Ocean Literacy 

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Guest Blog by the Ocean Literacy Committee: Join our winter ocean literacy webinar series!

Posted By Lisa D. Tossey, Monday, November 21, 2016
Updated: Monday, November 28, 2016

The NMEA Ocean Literacy Committee is hosting a three-part webinar series. Each webinar will cover a different topic and topics will build on the one prior.

Current Special Report coverWebinar 1:
Tuesday, January 17

Exploring and Applying the Ocean Literacy Scope and Sequence for Grades K–12

11:30 a.m. HST/1:30 p.m. PST/4:30 p.m. EST

This interactive webinar will engage participants in opportunities to explore the Ocean Literacy Scope and Sequence for Grades K–12. We will discuss how to apply these grade-level appropriate conceptual progressions, designed to increase Ocean Literacy, to the development of learning experiences and instructional materials for use in K–12 classrooms, informal environments, and professional learning opportunities for educators.

Presented by:

  • Catherine Halversen, Lawrence Hall of Science at UC Berkeley
  • Craig Strang, Lawrence Hall of Science at UC Berkeley
  • Lynn Tran, Lawrence Hall of Science at UC Berkeley
  • Lynn Whitley, Wrigley Institute of Environmental Studies, University of Southern California

Duration: 90 minutes

NOTE: During this webinar, we suggest participants have ready access to the conceptual flow diagram we will investigate, a copy of which can be found here >

UPDATE (1/25): View a recording of this webinar here > 

Ocean Literacy alignmentWebinar 2:
Thursday, February 9

Alignment of the Ocean Literacy Framework with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)

10:30 a.m. HST/12:30 p.m. PST/3:30 p.m. EST

This webinar will build your familiarity and understanding of the Ocean Literacy - NGSS alignment tool. We will first describe why alignment of the Ocean Literacy Framework with NGSS is needed, and explain the rating scale used to describe the different relationships between the Ocean Literacy Principles and the Disciplinary Core Ideas that comprise the Next Generation Science Standards. Participants will explore the alignment tool through the examination of particular grade bands, Ocean Literacy Principles and DCIs, along with the ratings explanations provided by a panel of experts. We will discuss your observations, questions and ideas for how to use the alignment document.

Presented by:

  • Sarah Pedamonte, Lawrence Hall of Science at UC Berkeley
  • Craig Strang, Lawrence Hall of Science at UC Berkeley
  • Lynn Whitley, Wrigley Institute of Environmental Studies, University of Southern California

NOTE: During this webinar, we suggest participants have ready access to the alignment documents, as well as a copy of the NGSS and the Ocean Literacy Scope and Sequence.

Prior to this webinar, we recommend you watch this video introduction to the NGSS in NSTA’s Learning Center if you are not familiar with the Next Generation Science Standards.

Duration: 60 minutes

UPDATE (2/19): View a recording of this webinar here > 

Instructions for Viewers: 
Please note that at several points during this webinar you will want to pause the recording to explore the alignment documents yourself. The recorded webinar has been edited to eliminate the time periods when we gave participants an opportunity to review these documents before moving on to the next part of the presentation.

 

Ocean Literacy guideWebinar 3:
Thursday, February 23

Organizing for Ocean Literacy - Implementation at Different Scales

8:00 a.m. HST/10:00 a.m. PST/1:00 p.m. EST

Join us for examples of how educators, scientists, and policy makers have deployed the Ocean Literacy Framework and the Ocean Literacy/NGSS Alignment document. We will focus on moving from ideas to impact by looking at examples of Ocean Literacy-inspired curricula, non-formal programs with a focus on Ocean Literacy, and how the alignment of NGSS with Ocean Literacy can be leveraged to support funding efforts, strategic planning activity, and teacher professional learning. Our format includes ample time for collegial conversation and questions, so please plan to join us!

Presented by:

  • Kurt Holland, Lead Science Communicator, Broader Impacts West
  • Diana Payne, Connecticut Sea Grant
  • Sarah Schoedinger, NOAA Office of Education

Duration: 60 minutes

Join using this link >

Instructions to Participants:
Please join the webinar a few minutes early to ensure you are able to see and hear the presenters. You will NOT need login credentials to join. The meeting host will accept your entry into the meeting room at the start of the webinar.

UPDATE (3/7): View a recording of this webinar here > 

- Sarah Schoedinger, Diana Payne, and Craig Strang, NMEA Ocean Literacy Committee

Tags:  guest blog  Ocean Literacy 

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Guest Blog by Elaine Brewer: Ocean Literacy Summit

Posted By Lisa D. Tossey, Thursday, November 17, 2016

Ocean Literacy SummitEvery two years, the New England Ocean Science Education Collaborative hosts an Ocean Literacy Summit; a day in which individuals gather together to learn new ways to spread knowledge about the ocean to their local communities. This November, the Ocean Literacy Summit was held at the University of Southern Maine in Portland, Maine. The theme this year was Ocean Literacy Principle 3: the ocean is a major influence on weather and the climate.

Dr. Andy Pershing opened the event with a relevant keynote addressing what the warming of the Gulf of Maine means for everyone, especially those of us who live around its waters. The two sessions of lightning talks—timed five-minute talks with 10 slides automatically advancing every 30 seconds—were as invigorating as they were informative. The panel on climate change education, moderated by Ari Daniel, was encouraging to everyone in the audience.

This year’s Summit had two additional new events. Interspersed throughout the day, participants could speak with educators at the Marine Education Fair. To close the Summit, participants were encouraged to sit and speak with presenters about the topics that intrigued them the most at the Concluding Café.

Ocean Literacy Summit For those who could join earlier, additional activities were held the day before the Summit. The National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation held an insightful workshop on how to empower people with information on climate change. Dr. Bob Chen from the University of Massachusetts, Boston held a Broader Impacts workshop showing individuals different ways to reach their audiences. During the evening, the Gulf of Maine Marine Education Association hosted the welcome reception at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute, introducing Summit participants to Peterson Toscano, a comedian with an ability to shed some humorous light on the heavy topic of climate change.

Throughout the Summit, marine scientists shared their latest findings while educators shared how they teach about climate change. Participants were encouraged to share their own insights during the Summit on social media with the event hashtag #OLSummit16. All posts can be viewed on Storify here >

- Elaine Brewer, NMEA Communications Pod and Social Media Chair

Tags:  guest blog  Ocean Literacy 

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Guest Blog by Géraldine Fauville: International ocean literacy survey expands to 16 languages

Posted By Lisa D. Tossey, Thursday, September 1, 2016

In a blog post last May, we introduced the first steps toward creating an International Ocean Literacy Survey. In this post, we will provide an update, and once again invite you join this 16 language, collaborative effort to measure our progress in building global ocean literacy. If you have access to 16-18 year old students, you can play a critical role in Round 2 of this spirited and entirely volunteer effort. Here is the link to provide to your students > 

Some Background: At the 2015 European Marine Science Educators Association (EMSEA)  Conference in Crete many of us discussed the urgent need to measure progress in the development of ocean literacy in our respective countries, regions, and even programs. We agreed to work together as a community to develop a common, widely accepted instrument to measure ocean literacy. The Lawrence Hall of Science at the University of California, Berkeley; the University of Gothenburg; and members of the EMSEA community took the lead on this unfunded, grassroots project by contributing survey items and gathering many others from marine educators throughout Europe and the U.S. who generously shared their intellectual property for this community effort. We edited and assembled the items into a comprehensive survey of ocean literacy, which was administered to 415 students last June in our first field test. Now we are ready for Round 2 of testing!

The National Marine Educators Association (NMEA) and Asian Marine Educators Association (AMEA), and Canadian Network of Ocean Educators (CaNOE) are now officially supporting and involved in the development of the project. Partners around the world volunteered to contribute additional items and to translate the survey into 16 languages. This version of the survey, which includes items measuring ocean knowledge and marine environmental attitudes, is now being disseminated through the networks of AMEA, CaNOE, EMSEA, NMEA and Scientix. It takes about 20 minutes to complete.

Now we need your help. We need as many 16-18 year olds as possible, all around the world, to take the survey to help us test and improve it.

Here is what you can do:

If you are a high school teacher (any subject) or if you have access to any children ages 16-18, please give this survey to your students to complete online as soon as possible. Here is the link >

We need as many responses as possible before September 15, 2016. If your students respond by then, the data will be analyzed and used in a presentation at the 2016 EMSEA conference in Belfast, Northern Ireland, in October. Responses after September 15 will still be used, and we need as many responses as possible, regardless of the date.

If you are not a high school teacher, please contact the teachers you know and ask them to give this survey to their students. Feel free to use or link to this post when you ask teachers for their help.

Please be sure to send us an email telling us that you are helping so that we can acknowledge you in all future publications.

What happens with the data? Data from this second field test will be analyzed centrally at Lawrence Hall of Science, and partners will be able to access their own data. Once the data are analyzed we will eliminate some questions that do not test well, and add in (and translate) new ones contributed by the community. We will continue testing the survey until we are satisfied that we have a truly valid and reliable, open-source, comprehensive international ocean literacy survey that can be freely used by educators in around the world.

Here is the inspiring list of languages that are being used to administer the International Ocean Literacy Survey:

  • Catalan
  • Chinese (Simplified)
  • Chinese (Traditional)
  • Croatian
  • Danish
  • Dutch
  • English
  • French
  • German
  • Greek
  • Italian
  • Japanese
  • Norwegian
  • Portuguese
  • Spanish
  • Swedish

Arabic and Romanian will be added in the next round of testing. If you do not find your native language in the list above, please contact us if you are interested in helping us with additional translations.

Thanks so much for your help! Please contact us with comments or suggestions.

Mac Cannady, Lawrence Hall of Science
Géraldine Fauville, University of Gothenburg and EMSEA Board of Directors, NMEA Board of Directors
Craig Strang, Lawrence Hall of Science and Chair, NMEA Ocean Literacy Committee

Tags:  international  Ocean Literacy  survey 

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Guest Blog: Opportunity to contribute to measuring Ocean Literacy! Want to join us?

Posted By Lisa D. Tossey, Sunday, May 1, 2016
Ocean Literacy

At the European Marine Science Educator Association 2015 Conference, members of the Ocean Literacy community discussed the urgent need to be able to measure progress in the development of Ocean Literacy in our respective countries and regions. We discussed a variety of ways to measure Ocean Literacy and ways that our community might use a widely accepted measurement tool. The Lawrence Hall of Science took the lead on this international project.

 

Here is what we have been up to and what we plan to do next:


  • We gathered the items from the various tools that have been used to measure constructs associated with Ocean Literacy. We compared the items and removed redundancies.

  • We will invite collaborators from European countries to translate the items on these scales to their language.

  • We will invite collaborators to administer these scales to a specific population (for example, 15-16 year olds).

  • We will gather the data and look at the item behavior within the scales and across countries to determine which set of items form scales for these constructs and seem to function well across linguistic and cultural differences.

  • We will finalize a valid and reliable instrument that will be freely available at least to all those who participate in its development.

 

Contributors will then be able to collect and analyze their own local/regional/national/project-specific data AND to contribute their data to a central repository at the Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California, Berkeley, so that various data sets can be compared to one another and aggregated into an international or global picture of ocean literacy over time. Isn’t that awesome?


We have 56 items so far, but we still have some gaps in the Ocean Literacy Principles and Concepts. Here are the concepts that we still need items for:

   Principle 1: concept H.

   Principle 2: concept B

   Principle 3: concept G

   Principle 4: concept C

   Principle 5: concept D

   Principle 6: concepts C & G

   Principle 7: concepts B,C, E & F

 

For more information about each of these concepts, please see the most recent version of the Ocean Literacy Brochure here >


We have spent so much time on all these questions that we might decide to move to the desert if we are asked to come up with a single more marine-related question. So here is where you can contribute! Please, put your thinking cap on and suggest good survey items addressing any of the missing concepts.


To make sure creative people go in the right direction, here are some helpful tips to make a good question:

  • Use as few words and as simple of words as possible.
  • Do not write negative questions such as "What is not a factor influencing sea level rise?"
  • Avoid local knowledge such as "What impact does the current have on the Belgian coast?"
  • Create only multiple choice questions with no more than 5 answer options.
  • All the answer options should be about the same length and the wrong answers should be realistic.
  • It is ok to have more than one correct answer per question. Just add "Select all that apply".
  • For number answers, make the differences large. Ex. "10%, 50%, 75%" are better than "49%, 50%, 51%"
  • Your question should be accurate enough that the correct answer is accurate regardless of your marine expertise. For example to the question "What is the salinity of the ocean? 3.5%, 0.01%, 50%, 90%", a lay person might answer 3.5% but an expert would tell you that the salinity varies largely.

We would love to receive your suggestion by mid-May. Please send your items to this address > 


Thank you very much for your valuable help!

 

Mac Cannady, Craig Strang and Géraldine Fauville

Lawrence Hall of Science

 University of California, Berkeley   

Tags:  Ocean Literacy 

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