Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Sign In   |   Join Us
Community Search
What's New
Blog Home All Blogs
Search all posts for:   

 

View all (155) posts »
 

Guest Blog by Anne Stewart: CaNOE's role in the global ocean literacy movement

Posted By Jeannette Connors, Tuesday, November 14, 2017

In the first of a three-part series, CaNOE's (Canadian Network for Ocean Education) Co-chair Anne Stewart explains CaNOE's place in the global ocean literacy movement.

CaNOE works to advance ocean literacy in Canada, but not in isolation. CaNOE, and Canadians, benefit by connecting to the global ocean literacy groundswell that is gaining momentum and imbuing ocean optimism.

Internationally, CaNOE has links to networks like the National Marine Educators Association (NMEA) in the USA, and the European Marine Science Educators Association (EMSEA). These are professional associations, which, like CaNOE, aspire to an ocean literate citizenry: people who understand the ocean’s influence on us and our influence on the ocean. Ocean literate citizens can also communicate about the ocean in meaningful ways and make informed and responsible decisions regarding the ocean’s well being and its gifts. NMEA is the oldest (40+years) and largest of these organizations, and is a primary proponent of the collaborative and evolving ocean literacy framework. CaNOE and EMSEA are of a similar young age, both arising around the time of the Galway Statement.

The tripartite Galway Statement – signed by the USA, EU and Canada in 2013 – placed ocean literacy as a foundational and crosscutting theme for transatlantic research cooperation. The signing was followed in Europe by substantial financial commitments to the ocean literacy projects Sea Change and ResponSEAble, both funded through Blue Growth, Horizon 2020. These projects are also buoyed by the Atlantic Ocean Research Alliance – Coordination and Support Action Project (AORA-CSA). The implementation of the Galway Statement is achieved internationally through AORA with senior tripartite leadership and through tripartite working groups that collaborate on areas of identified mutual cooperation.

Transatlantic cooperation in the Galway sense refers both to the North Atlantic with its Arctic interactions, and to the tripartite countries, unions, and seas on both sides of the North Atlantic. In Canada, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans and Canadian Coast Guard (DFOCCG) leads and consults nationally throughout the year with the Galway Canadian Marine Working Group. Chairs and co-chairs of identified areas of co-operation also work internationally with their respective AORA working groups. (To help visualize AORA and how it works, see the image below.)

The Trilateral Galway Implementation Committee tasked the AORA Ocean Literacy working group to also work with AORA Aquaculture and AORA Seabed Mapping working groups and to advance the G7 Ministers’ action on plastic in the ocean. With so much going on, the AORA Ocean Literacy working group recently expanded to include leadership from NMEA, EMSEA and CaNOE. This was formalized through a unanimous recommendation by the AORA Ocean Literacy Working Group Co-leads in their contribution to the Galway “Golden Paper” accepted by Galway Implementation Leadership. This formalizes bottom up, as well as top down participation, in boosting ocean literacy across the Atlantic by assuring participation of individuals who are well immersed, dedicated to, and fluently conversant in the drive towards ocean literacy.

The current AORA Ocean Literacy working group has collaborated for four years, since formative transatlantic ocean literacy workshops were held in the UK, Belgium, Sweden and Portugal. CaNOE was there for the entire voyage in its frail little craft, crewed solely by volunteers. There was no funding or travel support from Canada and it was only through the generosity of the European Commission, Portugal, EMSEA, NMEA and AORA-CSA that CaNOE volunteers were able to participate at the transatlantic ocean literacy table. From the inception of the idea of transatlantic ocean literacy, Canada has been involved via CaNOE.

- CaNOE Co-chair Anne Stewart

In November, 2017 CaNOE co-chair was joined by Tara Donaghy, appointed by Fisheries and Oceans and Canadian Coast Guard. Tara is well positioned to make a really positive difference to the future of collaborations and a very warm welcome is extended.

Tags:  EMSEA  guest blog  ocean education  Ocean Literacy 

Share |
Permalink | Comments (0)
 
Sign In
Sign In securely